Global and Local winds

By: Dylan Lamberth

Global winds

Global winds are major winds that blow from one direction over long distances. Global winds are caused by the uneven heating of the Earth's surface, which sends convection currents in motion. Some examples of global wind are the polar easterlies, the westerlies, and the trade winds.

Local winds

Local winds are winds that generally move short distances and can blow from any direction. Local winds are caused by local changes in air pressure. Some examples of local winds are sea breezes, land breezes and mountain and valley breezes. Local winds cover very short distances.

Compare and Contrast Land and Sea Breezes

Land breezes occur at night and when air over the land is warmer. As warm air rises, it creates an area of low pressure. At night air over the ocean is warmer. As the warm air rises it forms an area of low pressure. Sea Breezes occur during the day, air over the ocean is cooler and forms an area of high pressure. The cool air flows to the land. Air over land is cooler and forms an area of high pressure. The cool air moves toward the ocean, producing a land breeze.