Social Studies

Professional Development Opportunities

Professional Development Opportunities


Jim Crow and Its Impact on African Americans Friday, October 8, 2021 - FREE


This seminar will focus on the roots of Jim Crow in the late 19th century. What was the catalyst for Jim Crow legislation? How did the laws and customs of Jim Crow get firmly established? How was it defended by its supporters? How was it attacked by civil rights advocates and how did African Americans respond to the systematic discrimination of Jim Crow? Join your colleagues for a deep dive into documents that describe what C. Vann Woodward called, “The Strange Career of Jim Crow.” This program is brought to you through a Teaching American History grant. It will be conducted as a Socratic discussion, utilizing primary source documents as the only readings, and with the Discussion Leader facilitating the conversation, instead of lecturing or presenting. Registrants, therefore, are highly encouraged to read all the documents in advance and come ready with questions. All attendees will receive a Letter of Attendance at the end of the seminar.

9:00am – 10:30am

LINK TO REGISTRATION:

Click Here to Register Or copy/paste http://go.teachingamericanhistory.org/l/556702/2021-08-27/j3xhzr



Becoming Washington: Utilizing Mt. Vernon’s Digital Resources Wednesday, November 3, 2021 - FREE


Amy Palo of the Cornell School District presents interesting look at George Washington. Through modeling the use of digital resources from Mt. Vernon itself, Amy will provide useful strategies for employing artifacts that will engage your students in an innovative look at our first president through the game, Becoming Washington, which immerses students in George Washington’s decision-making process.

1:00pm – 3:00pm

LINK to REGISTRATION:

Click Here to Register or copy/paste https://www.mylearningplan.com/WebReg/ActivityProfile.asp?D=10953&I=3910463



American Women Fight for Equality Wednesday, November 10, 2021 - FREE

Women’s political, social and economic status has undergone several transformations in American history. What are the key moments in the struggle for justice for women in America? How does attending, especially to women, disclose the story of justice in America? What are the tensions between gender and equality, in their several dimensions, This seminar will explore readings and documents in three of those stages: Women of Reform and Revolution, Women in the Progressive Era and Voting Booths and Is Suffrage Enough – the Lasting Impact.in this story? Join Dr. Melissa Matthes of the U.S. Coast Guard Academy for an engaging look at these important topics. This program is brought to you through a Teaching American History grant. It will be conducted as a Socratic discussion, utilizing primary source documents as the only readings, and with the Discussion Leader facilitating the conversation, instead of lecturing or presenting. Registrants, therefore, are highly encouraged to read all the documents in advance and come ready with questions. All attendees will receive a Letter of Attendance at the end of the seminar.

1:00pm – 2:30pm

LINK TO REGISTRATION:

Click Here to Register Or copy/paste http://go.teachingamericanhistory.org/l/556702/2021-08-27/j3xqfh



Voices in Democracy: Race, Gender, and Equality Wednesday, February 16, 2022 - FREE

From the 17th century on, the realities of racial and gender inequality have been at odds with America’s self-understanding as a “new world” of opportunity for all. How do we describe and analyze the intersections and connections between race, gender, religion, justice, and liberty? What do they reveal about the political engagement of women and how does that influence the discussion of constitutional interpretation and of human equality? This seminar will focus on key moments in the struggle to secure the natural rights of liberty and equality for all Americans. This program is brought to you through a Teaching American History grant. It will be conducted as a Socratic discussion, utilizing primary source documents as the only readings, and with the Discussion Leader facilitating the conversation, instead of lecturing or presenting. Registrants, therefore, are highly encouraged to read all the documents in advance and come ready with questions. All attendees will receive a Letter of Attendance at the end of the seminar.

9:00am – 12:30pm

LINK TO REGISTRATION:

Click Here to Register Or copy/paste http://go.teachingamericanhistory.org/l/556702/2021-08-30/j41kty

CPE Courses for Social Studies

Exploring Your Neighborhood and City September 27 – Oct 18, 2021 $399 for 3 CPE Credits/90 Act 48 Hours

This course will provide classroom teachers with a first-hand knowledge of the historical and architectural development in Pittsburgh, a city of 90 neighborhoods. Sarah Greenwald of the Pittsburgh History and Landmarks Foundation, shares the advantages of using the immediate community as a "classroom” for teaching social studies, art, English, as well as other subjects - and to provide teachers with the skills required to use the community as a learning resource in their own classroom. Click HERE to register.

Pittsburgh Heritage I October 22 – Nov 11, 2021 $399 for 3 CPE Credits/90 Act 48 Hours

The AIU is proud to partner with the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation to offer this asynchronous, online experience of our city! This Continuing Professional Education (CPE) course will provide the classroom teacher with the opportunity to explore Pittsburgh's heritage through the lens of architecture. Participants will be introduced to interrelated topics of local and regional history, cultural heritage, historic preservation, and visual awareness of the local environment, with creative classroom applications. Upon successful completion of this course, participants will receive 3 CPE graduate-level credits and 90 Act 48 hours to maintain your teaching certificate. Click HERE to register.

Pittsburgh Heritage II November 12 – Dec 2, 2021 $299 for 2 CPE Credits/60 Act 48 Hours

Pittsburgh Heritage II will continue the themes introduced in Pittsburgh Heritage I, i.e. teaching local history and heritage through the lens of architecture. Participants will explore further the interrelated topics of local and regional history, cultural heritage, architectural styles, and visual awareness of the local environment. Remote walking tours, creative activities, readings, and a mini-lesson project will give educators an opportunity to gain further insight and enhance their ability to transfer such knowledge through established curricula to their students.

NOTE: The Pittsburgh Heritage I course is not a prerequisite. This course may be taken as a stand-alone course. Click HERE to register.

To consider another CPE course to fulfill your Act 48 requirements, or credits for pay-scale movement or Level II certification, consult our full CPE Course catalog HERE.

For additional information contact: paul.cindric@aiu3.net