"What goes up must come down."

Isaac Newton

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Isaac Newton's Life.

On January 4, 1643, Isaac Newton was born in Woolsthorpe, Lincolnshire, England. He was the only son of a local farmer, also named Isaac Newton, who died three months before he was born. A premature baby born tiny and weak, Newton was not expected to survive. When he was 3 years old, his mother, Hannah Ayscough Newton, remarried a minister, and went to live with him, leaving young Newton with his grandmother. At age 12, Newton was reunited with his mother after her second husband died. She brought along her three small children from her second marriage. Newton had been enrolled at the King School in Grantham, a town in Lincolnshire. His mother pulled him out of school, to make him a farmer and have him tend the farm. That did not happen. He returned to King, School to finish his basic education. His uncle, a graduate of the University of Cambridge, Trinity College, persuaded newton's mother to have him enter the university. Newton enrolled in a program similar to a work study in 1661. During his first three years at Cambridge, Newton was taught the standard curriculum, but was fascinated with the more advanced science. All his spare time was spent reading from the modern philosophers. The result was a less-than-stellar performance, but one that is understandable given his dual course of study. It was during this time that Newton kept a second set of notes, entitled "Quaestiones Quaedam Philosophicae" ("Certain Philosophical Questions"). The "Quaestiones" reveal that Newton had discovered the new conception of nature that provided the framework for the Scientific Revolution. Though Newton graduated with no honors or distinctions, his efforts won him the title of scholar and four years of financial support for future education. Unfortunately, in 1665, the Great Plague that was ravaging Europe had come to Cambridge, forcing the university to close. Newton returned home to pursue his private study. It was during this 18-month hiatus that he conceived the method of infinitesimal calculus, set foundations for his theory of light and color, and gained significant insight into the laws of planetary motion—insights that eventually led to the publication of his Principia in 1687. With the threat of plague subsided in 1667, Newton returned to Cambridge and was elected a minor fellow at Trinity College, still not considered a standout scholar. However, in the ensuing years, his fortune improved. Newton received his Master of Arts degree in 1669, before he was 27. During this time, he came across Nicholas Mercator's published book on methods for dealing with infinite series. Newton quickly wrote a treatise, De Analysi, expounding his own wider ranging results. He shared this with friend and mentor Isaac Barrow, but didn't include his name as author.

He was the fonder of The Laws Of Motion and The Laws Of Gravity.

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Isaac Newtons Family.

Isaac Newton was never married and never had any kids, Although he was engaged, they never married because he was too caught up in his work and studies.
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Where.

Trinstin's High School.

Time: 12:45

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