Anticipation Guide

Priming Strategy

Anticipation Guide

This priming activity helps students activate prior knowledge and reflect on the topic being studied. Students receive a sheet with several declarative sentences about the topic they will be reading about. The students decide if they ‘agree’ or ‘disagree’ with each of the sentences by putting an ‘A’ or ‘D’ after each statement. After completing the sheet, students gather in groups to discuss their answers and share why they ‘agreed’ or ‘disagreed’ with the topic. Students read the text and then review, revise and discuss what they learned from the text with their answers in the Anticipation Guide. Create statements about the topic in a text (not a quote) that would be challenging for learners to be 100% sure of the answer. Remember, it's ok to be wrong in priming. The goal here is for them to back up why they think what they think. Class discussion around the statements can be very interesting and it is important that the teacher uses neutral language. Try asking, "What do you think"? and "Why do you think that"? The teacher can also turn to the class and ask, "Who disagrees"? "Why do you disagree"? Some students bring prior knowledge to the table and they become the expert on the topic. Remember it's the thinking you want to acknowledge at this point, instead of the right answer. This dialogical thinking and discussion piques interest in learners to really want to read the text to find out the correct answer.