PBIS Bulletin

Be Respectful, Be Responsible, & Be Safe!

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Intervention Zone


Looking at Data: Back in January, our team noticed high levels of referrals during recess which included rough play and inappropriate language. We compared this data to current referrals in hopes that the resources we provided you with in our last newsletter had promoted positive changes. We are excited to say that we have noticed a small decrease in referrals during recess. Though the decrease is small, it is a positive one and this is due to YOU! Thank you for thinking about your students who struggle during this time and using positive interventions to help guide them toward better choices. Each of you help make the 3Bs work at WSES!


Below is another tip that may help students who continue to struggle with behaviors:


Teachers often find it difficult to monitor the frequency of problem behaviors some students exhibit. In this clever behavior-management strategy, the teacher uses rubber-bands placed around the wrist to keep track of these behaviors.


Materials:


Rubber-bands


Simple student self-monitoring chart


Preparation:


Develop a reward menu for the individual selected for this intervention. Decide how many points that you will require the student to earn to 'buy' specific rewards.


Review with the student the kinds of disruptive classroom behaviors (e.g., talking out, out of seat, approaching other students at inappropriate times, etc.) that you are targeting to be reduced. Give the student clear examples of each problem behavior.

Introduce the rubber-band monitoring intervention (described below), making sure that the student fully understands the procedures and criteria for success.


Steps in Implementing This Intervention


Step 1: During the period of the day that monitoring is in effect, put up to 6 rubber-bands around one wrist at the start of each half-hour. Each time that you must verbally remind or prompt the student about his or her behavior, transfer a rubber-band from one wrist to the other.


Step 2: At the end of each half-hour, count up the number of rubber-bands remaining on the original wrist. If at least one rubber-band remains, your student earns a '+' rating for that half-hour.


Step 3: Briefly approach the student at the end of each half-hour to review his or her behavioral performance and (if earned) to have the student add a '+' to a simple monitoring chart

taped to the student's desk (Sample Monitoring Chart)


Step 4: When the student has earned a sufficient number of '+' points, allow the student to redeem those points for a reward.


Step 5: As your student's classroom behaviors improve, gradually reduce the number of rubber-bands that you place on your wrist at the start of each monitoring period-until you have only 1-2. At that point, you can consider discontinuing this strategy or using it only intermittently.


Hopefully this tip is useful and provides you with another idea on how to implement positive reinforcement to help students who struggle with behavior. If you are in search for more ideas or need further support, please let our PBIS team know. We are here to help you and most importantly our students so that their year is a successful and positive experience.


"Every accomplishment starts with the decision to try."

Kudos to Students Displaying 3 B's at the Career Fair Town Meeting!!!

Media & Mindset Matters...

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Consider wrapping up the school year with a video and/or read aloud about the importance of having a Growth Mindset!

EOG’s are just around the corner!

Below are a few important behavioral expectations

for students to remember during EOG testing!


  • Remind students to be very quiet and respectful when walking in the hallways and outside around the trailers and pods so 3rd, 4th, and 5th grade students can concentrate during testing.


  • The playground will be off limits until testing is finished.


  • Be on the lookout for the EOG lunch schedule and be aware of any time changes.


  • This is an all hands on deck time of year; most TA’s and specialists will be needed to proctor for tests. Thank you for all of the cooperation to make this run smoothly!