Factors Affecting Participation

While we can see that sport benefits people and fulfils needs in their lives it is important to point out that not all people have an equal access to sporting opportunities.

Disability

Sport for people with disabilities has changed considerably, with governing bodies devising rules and activities suitable for all disabilities.

The then Sports Council now Sport England, published an action plan in 1993 to help the disabled take part in sport.

The seven main objectives were:

  • To raise the profile of disability in sport.
  • To ensure that plans for sport included people with disabilities.
  • To provide sporting opportunities for people with disabilities.
  • To improve access to sport.
  • To encourage people with disabilities in international sports.
  • To ensure the best use of resources and increase finance.
  • To make sure that the sporting needs of people with disabilities are met.

Over time more and more sport is being made available to people with disabilities.

The profile of sport for the disabled is rising with the televised wheelchair basketball and the media coverage of the Paralympics.

More sports centres now make provision for people with disabilities.

Gender

Fewer females pro rata take part in sport than males.

At the ancient Olympic Games, women were not allowed to watch the activities let alone participate in them.

By the end of the nineteenth century, English women, from the middle classes, were taking part in sport. Victorian attitudes meant that women often played in cumbersome dresses making movement difficult.

In the early twentieth century, the national governing bodies of some sports were formed and there were organised competitions for women, usually separate from men.

Women competed in the Olympic Games for the first time in 1904 but only in archery.

Even in the 1996, Atlanta games there were 163 men's events and only 97 women's events.

The First World War was the turning point for women's sport, where the myth that women were weak, had little energy and were unable to cope with men's work was broken.

If they could cope with the work of the munitions factory then they could cope with men's sport.

Heavy industry called women to work again during the Second World War but after the war more women continued to work.

They had more money to spend and more freedom to participate in sport and leisure activities.

Physique- Somatotype (endomorph, mesomorph, ectomorph).

You need to know the categories of

somatotypes and know specifically how a particular

body type could affect the choice of and its

suitability for a particular activity/event.

There are 3 types of somatotypes:


  • endomorph: pear shaped: strength events
  • mesomorph: wedge shaped: all round athlete
  • ectomorph: thin and slight: distance runners


Big image

Age

The sport and leisure pursuits that people take part are closely related to their age and local tradition.

As people get older the time spent taking part in sport becomes less and the nature of the sport changes.

Activities with high-energy requirements and output such as rugby are generally associated with younger players while activities that rely on skill rather than physical fitness such as lawn bowls are associated with older people.

As the body ages it becomes less flexible, strength is lost as are speed and stamina.

Sprains and other minor injuries become more frequent and recovery time becomes longer.

There are activities where age does not affect participation such as swimming, walking and playing golf.

There is therefore no reason why sport and related activities should not be participated in at any age.

Age only limits the type of activity.


The sport and leisure pursuits that people take part are closely related to their age and local tradition.

As people get older the time spent taking part in sport becomes less and the nature of the sport changes.

Activities with high-energy requirements and output such as rugby are generally associated with younger players while activities that rely on skill rather than physical fitness such as lawn bowls are associated with older people.

As the body ages it becomes less flexible, strength is lost as are speed and stamina.

Sprains and other minor injuries become more frequent and recovery time becomes longer.

There are activities where age does not affect participation such as swimming, walking and playing golf.

There is therefore no reason why sport and related activities should not be participated in at any age.

Age only limits the type of activity.



Big image

Risk and Challenge

Questions asked are usually

why an individual would want to take part in a

challenging activity. What safety measures must

individuals consider.

Main appeal of many activities is the challenge

combined with an acceptable level of risk (what

safety checks would you do beforehand?)

By Emma Brough