Ancient Roman FAQs

Crispinus Hardy

Writing

The ancient Romans did not have paper but they did have papyrus. But they primarily used wax tablets and drew on them with styluses.

Family

Roman families differ from modern families greatly in multiple ways. One of the main things is slaves. Roman families had slaves but modern families do not. The father has complete control over the family unlike in modern times where mothers and children have rights and make their own decisions. Mothers also have jobs in modern times unlike ancient Rome. One of the biggest things is that it was not unusual for the father to not accept the child at birth. You can do thus now but the baby does not go in the garbage.


Roman parents are definitively different from the parent you and I have today. For one thing the mothers are always at home teaching the children. The females never really went to a tutor. The father is very different because he takes care of the sons trades and arranges his marriage until he is around 25.


Names are also very different in roman times vs. modern times. The names of roman times sometimes had 2 or 3 first names unlike the one we have today. They have a praenomen which is like a prefix, a nomen which is their name, and a nomina that is like a suffix at the end of the name. These name also had a more profound meaning then our names today.

Men's Clothing

Men and boys dressed in togas in ancient Rome. This was how the social classes were shown or displayed. People of Higher class wear fancier togas to be very distinguished. They also were allowed to wear one piece of jewelry. It was like a wax oval that was used like a seal of approval or signature. they dipped it in wax and stamped it on paper to sign things.

Women's clothing

Women in Rome dressed slightly different then men in ancient time. They also wore togas over a tunic but with a purple border to protect themselves from the evil eye. Girls also wear lots of jewelry to signify that they are engaged or soon to be married.

Citations

"Writing and Language." World Eras. Ed. John T. Kirby. Vol. 3: Roman Republic and Empire, 264 B.C.E.- 476 C.E. Detroit: Gale, 2001. 170-172. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

"Family." The Greenhaven Encyclopedia of Ancient Rome. Don Nardo. San Diego: Greenhaven Press, 2002. 153-155. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

"Names." The Greenhaven Encyclopedia of Ancient Rome. Don Nardo. San Diego: Greenhaven Press, 2002. 181-182. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015

Tortora, Phyllis. "Toga." Encyclopedia of Clothing and Fashion. Ed. Valerie Steele. Vol. 3. Detroit: Charles Scribner's Sons, 2005. 329-331. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

McManus, Barbara F. "Roman Clothing, Part I." Roman Clothing, Part I. VROMA, Aug. 2003. Web. 14 Sept. 2015.

"The Dress of Roman Women." Arts and Humanities Through the Eras. Ed. Edward I. Bleiberg, et al. Vol. 2: Ancient Greece and Rome 1200 B.C.E.-476 C.E. Detroit: Gale, 2005. 106-109. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.