Winfield Weekly

Little People, Big Dreams, Bright Futures (3-16-15)

Week-at-a-Glance (March 16-20)

Monday- Disability Read Alouds (see emailed schedule)

Tuesday-Disability Read Alouds (see emailed schedule)

Wednesday- School PD @ 8:05/ Disability Read Alouds (see emailed schedule)

Thursday-Disability Read Alouds (see emailed schedule)

Friday- Grade Level Mtgs @ 8:05 (Jillian w/2nd grade)/ Jillian OOB 9-1 (Leadership Meeting)/ Winfield Sticks Together Fundraiser @ 2pm

THIS WEEK'S TEACHERS TO-DO


  • Continue Unit 4 of CP 2.0. Please reach out if you need help. This unit is reflective.
  • Schedule Guided Reading Lesson. If you are on the FORMATIVE assessment (1 rating per year), please schedule a guided reading lesson with me to observe in the next 2-3 weeks. I'd like to complete these prior to Spring Break. I will be coming to you to schedule in the next day or two.
  • Continue sending your WEEKLY Classroom Newsletters. Include me on your email if you send it electronically to your families. ALL teachers are expected to communicate to their families on a weekly basis.
  • Turn off lights when not in your classroom. Even if you are going for copies, shut them off. Every little bit helps with our energy bills!
  • Remember that I am here to support YOU...if you need me--please ask. Walkthroughs and observations will continue.

Notes and Other News...

1. If you are ill, put in for a sub ASAP. If you wait until the morning to request a sub, it is very difficult to obtain one.

2. We will practice a tornado and fire drill this week. Tornado tentatively planned for Thursday. Fire is dependent on weather and Jackie's availability!

3. If you are interested in tutoring, please let me know. I have had several parents ask lately for recommendations.

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PINT-SIZE PD

Carol Ann Tomlinson on Teachers Who Make a Difference

(Originally titled “Teachers Who Stare Down Poverty”)


In this thoughtful article in Educational Leadership, differentiation guru Carol Ann Tomlinson describes how some remarkable teachers succeed with the children of poverty:


Believe – These educators “accept as a given that there are few limits on what individuals can accomplish through hard, savvy work,” says Tomlinson.

Respect – They “[s]ee richness in the lives, experiences, and cultures of youth they mentor.”

Connect – They embrace a young person’s worth, even when the child pushes them away.

Stretch horizons – They orchestrate experiences that expand the child’s sense of possibility – a computer camp, a play, a choir.

Set targets – “Goal-setting and planning are learned skills crucial to success in almost any area,” says Tomlinson. “Educators who stare down poverty don’t assume students come equipped with those skills.”

Build skills – These might include reading, writing, public speaking, applying for college, being assertive.

Live in two worlds – “Often the invitation to build a dream is an invitation to move into a different circle of life,” says Tomlinson. “Teachers must help young people become bicultural… and deal with the accompanying emotional tensions.”

Build networks – “It’s lonely to have aspirations that set you apart from friends,” she says. Effective teachers connect students with like-minded peers and supportive adults.

Hang in there – “These mentor-educators accept that the students whom they champion at age 10 will still need their support at 16,” Tomlinson concludes. “When failures happen, they help the student refocus, regroup, and restart.”


“Teachers Who Stare Down Poverty” by Carol Ann Tomlinson in Educational Leadership, May 2013 (Vol. 70, #8, p. 88-89), www.ascd.org; Tomlinson can be reached at

cat3y@virginia.edu.