Elementary Math Newsletter

January 5th - January 15th

Ramblings of Jennifer & Stephanie...

Team Leaders and Spotlight Teachers, please make sure to forward this newsletter onto your team members and any SPED support teachers that you feel could benefit from this information.



Welcome to the second semester!!! In wrapping up the information we learned from Dr. Jo Boaler there are a few things we would like for you to think about in starting off the New Year. Math is a subject that takes time to learn and is dependent on the effort one puts into it. As you work with your students, value depth over speed. Being good at math does not mean being fast at math. We want to encourage deep thinking in math. Some of the top mathematicians will say that they are slow at doing math. When discussing math with students, don’t let the fastest students drive the discussion. Don’t take the answer from the first hand that goes up. We want students to think deeply about a problem, make connections, reason and justify their thinking. To do this, think about the task you have your students complete. What conversations are they having with other students? What conversations are they having with you? We want them to see that math is about learning and not just performing. (Getting the right answer.)

Highlighting Process Skills

We have been focusing on ways to organize our math ideas. We have looked at strip diagrams and graphs. This newsletter, we are going to focus on organization of our math data using Venn Diagrams. The process TEKS we are focusing on this week are Process TEKS 1D, 1E, and 1F. The TEKS read:


TEKS 1D: Communicate mathematical ideas, reasoning, and their implication using multiple representations, including symbols, diagrams, graphs, and language as appropriate.


TEKS 1E: Create and use representations to organize, record, and communicate mathematical ideas.


TEKS 1F: Analyze mathematical relationships to connect and communicate mathematical ideas.


A Venn diagram is a tool that enables students to organize information such as the attributes of shapes, data, and numbers. It is also a valuable tool to use in problem solving situations and to classify similarities and differences in numbers or shapes. Students who are just learning about Venn diagrams can start with just one circle and can answer questions that only have two answer choices. For instance: shoes that tie, shoes that do not tie. As students become familiar with how to use Venn diagrams, more circles can be added and more complex questions can be answered.


Venn diagrams can be used to look at similarities and differences in all areas of mathematics. Some topics that can be analyzed in math through the use of a Venn diagram are: shapes, measurement, even/odd numbers, and multiples.


Our challenge to you is to include a Venn diagram activity in your plans somewhere in the next couple of weeks to see how your students use this great tool to organize and justify the mathematics that they are learning about!

Revisiting Inferring in Mathematics

In a few previous newsletters, we revisited the "Braiding" process or the process of using comprehension strategies to help students comprehend or make sense of word problems. In this newsletter, we are going to focus on the comprehension strategy of making inferences or inferring.


I found this great BLOG that explains why we need to infer in math and suggests activities that can help students practice inferring in math.


Don't forget to teach the required Inference Math Comprehension lesson at your grade level!

Don't Forget!

  • Week of January 11th - Math Benchmark
  • January 19th - Benchmark Scanning Deadline
  • January 21st & January 25th - 3rd and 4th Grade Data Meetings
  • January 26th - Math Academy

Kindergarten

TEKS: K.2D, K.2F & K.3A


For the week of January 5th-8th, kindergartners are going to review subitizing (TEKS K.2D) and practice generating a number that is one more than or one less than another number up to at least 20 (TEKS K.2F). Take a look at the unpacked TEKS above and reminders below to help you plan the lessons for this week.


Reminders:


  • Subitizing focus is on numbers 1-10.
  • When subitizing, include ten frames and dot cards.
  • Students have been generating numbers that are more than, less than, or the same as another number using concrete and/or pictorial models this year (TEKS K.2E). The TEKS for this week, TEKS K.2F, focuses on students generating a number one more or one less than another number without pictorial or concrete models.


For the week of January 11th-15th, students are going to focus on the action of joining to represent addition (TEKS K.3A). Take a look at the unpacked TEKS above and reminders below to help you plan the lessons for this week.


Reminders:


  • Focus is on the ACTION of joining where the result is unknown.
  • Make sure to give students lots of hands-on practice with manipulatives to model the action of joining.
  • Students need to understand that when they join two numbers/sets/groups together they are performing the addition operation.
  • This is the foundation to addition problem solving.

1st Grade

TEKS: 1.2B, 1.2C, 1.2D, 1.2E, 1.2F, 1.2G & 1.3A


For the week of January 5th-8th, 1st Grade students are going to review place value of numbers up to 99. The TEKS being reviewed this week are TEKS 1.2B, 1.2C, 1.2D, 1.2E, 1.2F, 1.2G & 1.3A.


Reminders:


  • Place value TEKS should not be taught in isolation. Example: Create the number 53 in any way. Stephanie created 53 by using 5 tens and 3 ones. What is the value of 5 tens? 50 What is the value of 3 ones? 3. So 50 + 3 = 53. Did someone else create the number 53 in a different way? Jennifer used 4 tens and 13 ones. Is this a correct way to represent 53? Yes. 4 tens has a value of 40 and 13 ones has a value of 13. 40 + 13 = 53.
  • Embed TEKS 1.2D and 1.2E together. Example: I want you to compose the number 25. Now I want you to compose a number larger than 25 on your place value mat. Use the sentence stem to compare the two numbers. Example: I created the number 43. 43 is larger than 25. I know this because 43 has 4 tens and 3 ones. 25 only has 2 tens and 5 ones.
  • Students need to be able to generate numbers greater than or less than using objects, pictorial models, and abstractly.
  • When comparing two numbers, have students place the numbers in the place value chart so they can accurately compare values. Take a look at this picture! It shows how students can put the number in a place value chart to compare the values in each place. It also shows that the students need to write both comparison statements.
  • No alligators to compare symbols. Take a look at the Math Coach's Corner Blog to give you some alternative ways to help students remember the greater than and less than symbols.
  • Students in 1st grade order numbers on an open number line. This is the beginning understanding of how numbers are written on a number line (Least to Greatest) for students.
  • Students should be able to list numbers written least to greatest and greatest to least. Make sure they order numbers using the place value chart as well!


For the week of January 11th-14th, students are going to use what they know about place value to learn numbers up to 120. The TEKS focus this week is TEKS 1.2B, 1.2C & 1.3A. Students will be learning how to compose, decompose and represent numbers up to 120. Take a look at the unpacking documents reminders above to help you plan the lessons for this week.

2nd Grade

TEKS: 2.4B


For the next two weeks, students in 2nd Grade are going to focus on learning how to subtract two 2-digit numbers (TEKS 2.4B). Take a look at the unpacked TEKS above, the CPA calendar, and the reminders below to help you plan your lessons for the next two weeks.


Reminders:


  • Students in 2nd grade DO NOT have to use the standard algorithm to subtract numbers.
  • The goal is for students to be flexible in the method they use to solve subtraction problems and to fluently be able to carry out the method to get the correct answer.
  • Teachers are responsible for teaching students multiple ways to subtract numbers such as: base-ten/concrete models, pictorial models, number lines, mental models, and the standard algorithm.
  • The standard algorithm should be the LAST subtraction method introduced to students (It is the most abstract). Students should have lots of experience subtracting using concrete models and pictorial models before being introduced to the standard algorithm.
  • Students are to be solving subtraction problems within context (either verbally or in a story problem).
  • Make sure to check subtraction by subtracting again using a different method or by using the inverse operation, addition.
  • Remember that each subtraction problem given on a worksheet is actually two problems if students check their computation.

3rd Grade

TEKS: 3.3A, 3.3C, 3.3D, 3.5C & 3.5E


For the week of January 5th-8th, 3rd Grade students are going to continue their focus on representing real-world relationships using number pairs in a table and using verbal descriptions to describe the relationship (TEKS 3.5C & 3.5E). Take a look at the unpacked TEKS above, the CPA calendar, and the reminders below to help you plan your lessons for this week.


Reminders


  • Students need to be able to create a table based on real-world relationships.
  • Students need to be able to pick the table that matches a real-world situation presented in a problem.
  • Students need to be able to extend a table.
  • Students need to be able to identify the relationship in a table.
  • Table inputs do NOT have to be in sequence.



For the week of January 11th-15th, students are going to start composing, decomposing and representing fractions (TEKS 3.3A, 3.3C & 3.3D). New information regarding these TEKS are in the reminders section below! Take a look at the unpacked TEKS above, the CPA calendar, and the reminders below to help you plan your lessons for this week.


Reminders


  • The TEKS focus this week expects students to represent, compose, decompose, and explain fractions greater than zero but less than one (No fractions greater than 1 this week!)
  • Students are expected to represent fractions using concrete and pictorial models including strip diagrams and number lines.
  • Representation of fractions (TEKS 3.3A) is limited to fractions with denominators of 2, 3, 4, 6, or 8.
  • Make sure students identify fractions of sets and wholes.
  • TEKS 3.3C & 3.3D are NOT limited to denominators of 2, 3, 4, 6, or 8.
  • 2nd Graders do not write fractions using fraction bar.
  • Vary the models used to represent fractions. Include circle models and grid models as well.
  • Students demonstrated 93% mastery on TEKS 3.3A last year.

4th Grade

TEKS: 4.4A, 4.4D, 4.4F, 4.4G, 4.4H, 4.5B & 4.5A


The focus for the week of January 5th-8th is solving and representing word problems using all 4 operations. (TEKS 4.4A, 4.4D, 4.4F, 4.4G, 4.4H, and 4.5A). Take a look at the unpacking TEKS above, the CPA calendar, and reminders below to help plan your lessons for this week.


Reminders:


  • Make sure students represent problems each time they solve either using strip diagrams or equations.
  • The QDPAC "thinking process" and "graphic organizer" should be modeled on every computational word problem.
  • Do NOT teach key words. Students should be focusing on which actions are happening in the story. Take a look at the Action Posters on Forethought under 4.1B.
  • As students complete independent word problem practice for the rest of the year, expect students to use the QDPAC "thinking process" and show the "graphic organizer" on each word problem. Make it an expectation!
  • Only 68% of Pearland ISD students last year tested at mastery on TEKS 4.4A, 4.4H and 4.5A.


The focus for the week of January 11th-15th is representing problems using an input-output table and numerical expressions (TEKS 4.5B). Take a look at the unpacking TEKS above, the CPA calendar, and reminders below to help plan your lessons for the next week.


Reminders:


  • Students are not expected to represent relationships that use more than one operation.
  • New Vocabulary: The input is the position in the sequence. The output is the value in the position. (See picture 4.5A Vocabulary below).
  • Students need to be able to create a table based on real-world relationships.
  • Students need to be able to pick the table that matches a real-world situation presented in a problem.
  • Students need to be able to extend a table.
  • Students need to be able to identify the relationship in a table.
  • Table inputs do NOT have to be in sequence.
  • 77% of PISD students mastered TEKS 4.5B on STAAR last year.