Islam

By Wyatt Clark

Islam

People pertaining to the Islam belief, or Muslims, have two core foundations. The Qur'an and the Sunnah. The Qur'an is the Islamic holy book. The Sunnah is the term for the example that Muhammad set for Muslims about how to live.


The five pillars of Islam are one of the most central teachings that Islams practice. The first pillar, Shahadah, is the To show belief in one God and in Muhammad’s prophet hood, a Muslim testifies, “I bear witness that there is no god but God, and that Muhammad is the messenger of God.” the first part of the Shahadah shows that Muslims believe in monotheism. Like Jews and Christians, Muslims believe that one all-powerful God—called Allah in Arabic—created the universe. they believe that the truth of that God was revealed to humankind through many prophets. These prophets include Adam, Abraham, Moses, and Jesus, who appear in Jewish and Christian scriptures. !e Qur’an honors all these prophets. The second part of the Shahadah Identifies Muhammad as God’s messenger. The second Pillar of Islam is Salat (SAH-laht), daily ritual prayer. Throughout Muslim communities in Southwest Asia, people are called to prayer five times a day: at dawn, noon, mid-afternoon, sunset, and a"er nightfall. !e third Pillar of Islam is Zakat, or charity. Muhammad told wealthy people to share their

riches with the less fortunate. This practice remains a basic part of Islam. According to the teachings of Islam, Muslims must share about one-fortieth (2.5 percent) of their surplus wealth each year. Zakat is similar to charitable giving in other religions. For instance, Jews and Christians also ask for donations, called tithes, to support their houses of worship and charitable activities. The fourth Pillar of Islam is siyam (see-YAM), or fasting (going without food). !e Qur’an instructs Muslims to fast for an entire month during Ramadan, the ninth month of the Islamic calendar. According to Islamic teachings, Ramadan was the month when God first revealed his message to Muhammad. During Ramadan, most Muslims fast from daybreak to sunset. However, pregnant women, travelers, the sick, the elderly, and young children do not have to fast. The fourth Pillar of Islam is hajj (HAJZH), the pilgrimage to the holy city of Makkah. In the twel"h month of the Islamic year, millions of believers from Southwest Asia and all over the world travel to Makkah. All adult Muslims who are able to make the journey are expected to perform the hajj at least once during their lifetime.