Zeus

King of the Gods

Childhood

Zeus was the youngest of Rhea and Cronus. Cronus had fear that he would be overthrown by one of his sons, so he swallowed all of his offspring — or so he thought. Rhea placed a stone in front of Cronus wrapped in swaddling cloth, and he swallowed it thinking it was Zeus. Rhea put Zeus on top of of Crete where he was raised by a Nymph or female goat, and was protected by Curetes, or young warriors (encyclopedia brittanica).

Clash of the Titans

When Zeus was a young man, he returned to his father, and made him regurgutate the offspring that he had swallowed, and led the revolt against his father. It went on for ten years, until Zeus released the Cyclopes and overthrew his father (Greek mythology).He then lived on top of Mount Olympus, a typical place for the god of weather to live in. As thanks for releasing the cyclopes, the cyclopes gave Zeus a lightning bolt, Hades a helmet of invisibility, and Poseidon a Trident. To split up the earth afterwards, the underworld went to Hades, the sea to Poseidon, and the earth and heavens to Zeus (mythology).

God of gods

Zeus was respected very much in his lifetime. Zeus was the god of weather, god of battle, the patron of games and agriculture, protector of the state, and was respected as the God of all the gods (Greek mythology).

women

Zeus was a ladies man. It is said that he had over 150 kids, and mated with so many different titanesses, goddesses, nymphs, and mortal women. Zeus would disguise himself as different animals and seduce his women, and take them with him, and make babies with them. Zeus did end up swallowing many offspring in fear of being overthrown (ancient history encyclopedia).

bibliography

Cartwright, Mark. "Hades." Ancient History Encyclopedia. Creative Commons: Attribution-NonComercial-ShareAlike, 9 July 2012. Web. 09 Nov. 2014.

The Editors of Encyclopædia Britannica. "Hades (Greek Mythology)." Encyclopedia Britannica Online. Encyclopedia Britannica, 22 Jan. 2014. Web. 08 Nov. 2014.

Hamilton, Edith, and Steele Savage. Mythology. Boston: Little, Brown, 1942. Print.

Hercules- Gospel of Truth 11. Dir. Ron Clements. Perf. James Woods. 1997. Videocassette.