Geography of Southern Africa

AG. Period 7

Namib Desert

A desert in the southwest of Africa and the Namib Desert stretches more than 1,200 miles along the Atlantic coast. Nambi desert is known to be the oldest desert and has been arid for almost 55 million years.
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Cape of Good Hope

The Cape of Good Hope is a rocky headland on the Atlantic coast of the Cape Peninsula, South Africa. It is important because the first European to reach was the Portuguese explorers Bartholomeu Dias in 1488, who named it the Cape of Storms. It was later renamed by John II of Portugal as Cape of Good Hope because of the great optimism engendered by the opening of a sea route to IndIa and the East.
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Johannesburg

A city in South Africa, the capital of the province of Gauteng. The region surrounding Johannesburg was originally inhabited by San Tribes. By the 13th century, groups of Bantu speaking people started moving southwards from central Africa and encroached on the indigenous San population
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Zambezi River

Zambezi is an African river that flows into the Indian Ocean. The first European to come across the Zambezi river was Vasco Da Gama in January 1498, who anchored at what he called Rio dos Bons Sinais.
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Limpopo River

The Limpopo River rises in central southern Africa, and flows generally eastwards to the Indian Ocean. The term Limpopo is the modified version of the original Sepedi name Diphororo tsa meetse. Diphororo tsa meetse means gushing strong waterfalls. Vasco da Dagama and his first expedition, probably the first Europeans to sight the river, anchored off the mouth in 1498.
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lusaka

Lusaka is the capital and largest city of Zambia. One of the fastest developing cities in Southern Africa. The area was expanded by European but mainly by British settlers in 1905 with the building of the railway. Lusaka was also the site of a village named after its headman Lusaka.
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Kalahari Desert


A high, vast, arid plateau in southern Africa, comprising most of Botswana with parts in Namibia and South Africa. Derived from the Twana word Kgala, meaning the great thirst, or Khalagari, Kgalagadi or Kalagare, meaning a waterless place, the Kalahari has vast areas covered by red sand without any permanent surface water. Drainage is by dry valleys, seasonally inundated pans, and the large salt pans of the Makgadikgadi Pan in Botswana. In 1996 DeBeers evaluated the potential of diamond mining at Gope. In 1997 the eviction of the Bushmen and Bakgalagadi tribes in the Central Kalahari Game Reserve from their land began. In 2006 a Botswana High Court ruled in favor of the Bushmen and Bakgalagadi tribes in the Central Kalahari Game Reserve claiming their eviction from the reserve was unlawful.


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Cabinda

An exclave of Angola at the mouth of the Congo River, separated from Angola by the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Portuguese explorers, missionaries and traders arrived at the mouth of the Congo River in the mid-15th century, making contact with the Manikongo, the powerful King of the Congo.
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Orange River

A river that rises in northeastern Lesotho and flows west for 1,155 miles across South Africa to the Atlantic Ocean. The river was named the Orange River by Colonial Robert Gordan commander of the Dutch East India Company garrison at Cape Town on a trip to the interior in 1779. Gordon named the river in honor of William V. of Orange. A popular but incorrect belief is that the river was named after the supposedly orange color of its water.
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Victoria Falls


A waterfall 355 feet high, on the Zambezi River, on the Zimbabwe Zambia border. By the end of the 1990s almost 300,000 people were visiting the falls annually, and this was expected to rise to over a million in the next decade. Unlike the game parks, Victoria Falls has more Zimbabwean and Zambian visitors than international tourists the attraction is accessible by bus and train, and is therefore comparatively inexpensive to reach


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