BEA TODAY

A paper by the students for the student

BEA Speech Team starts 2016 season.

By: Logan Enger


Blue Earth-Five members of the BEA Speech Team began their 2016 season in Worthington at the high school on February 6, 2016, to compete and gain experience. Students performed their categories and earned awards.


Speech is a MSHSL (Minnesota State High School League) activity. Coach Ehlers says, “Kids in speech grow as speakers and writers and make lasting friendships.”

The BEA speech team began their competitive season during the first week in February in Worthington. The speech team will compete in different towns throughout the season. Students practice from 3:30-5:00 on Mondays at the Middle School in Mrs. Ehlers’ room, and practices are also held at the high school too from 3:30-5:00 in Ms. Chrisman’s room.”

There are 13 a lot of different categories in competition speech. Some of them are: drama, creative expression, poetry, informative speaking, storytelling creative expression and many many more.

To sign up, students should see either coach Ehlers or Chrisman, Eligible students should turn in a $25 registration fee. MSHSL fine arts registration form to a coach or to the school office.


If you’re interested in coming to watch a tournament, there is food available to buy at most meets, so bring lunch money and be ready to see what speech is all about.







Kids taking Journalism class are creating the school newspaper.

By: Logan E.


Blue Earth-Journalism class is an encore class which means you do not have to take it it is not required.


In this class 7th grade students work on planning and preparing the school newspaper. Students are responsible for writing articles that have to do with activities that are going on in or around school. As reporters, students have to edit these articles and publish them into the newspaper.

Gathering research includes contacting sources. Journalism students have to send emails to people who know about the topic they are writing about. They send emails about questions they have to write about and sometimes also set up a time to meet in person for an interview. “The writing process is very easy then when you have the information to write about.” Says Cameron Anderson. The kids make a rough draft then have it checked and edited by at least three other students and then their teacher, Michelle Ehlers. The kids learn not to put opinions in the article. If they do, they have to quote them with who said it. If they don't, it all should be all facts. Then the Journalism kids revise it and make it sound and look better so it can be published.

We publish the articles into a website called Smore. On Smore it formats articles into a newspaper form, and journalists can put captions on any pictures they’ve added. Taking or finding pictures to go with their articles is also a part of class. Writing cations tells what the picture is about. In Journalism class the kids learn how to plan, research, interview, write, edit, and publish a news article. The kids learn not to put opinions in the article.