The Mistral Cycle

By Ryan Carter

Directions

  1. A graphic that illustrates hormone levels throughout the menstrual cycle, with correct citation.
  2. Explanation of how each hormone level (LH, FSH, progesterone, estrogen) fluctuates throughout the cycle. (Refer to http://www.ck12.org/section/The-Menstrual-Cycle/ to assist you.)
  3. Description of how endometrial lining changes due to hormones.
  4. Description of follicular development based on hormones
  5. If a pregnancy occurs, explanation of how hormone levels change.
  6. If a pregnancy occurs, explanation of how the endometrial lining changes.
Big image

The Menstrual Cycle and Exercise Metabolism - Part One. (2011, February 7). Retrieved April 29, 2015, from http://thatpaleoguy.com/2011/02/07/the-menstrual-cycle-and-exercise-metabolism-part-one/

How The hormones fluxuate

In the beginning of the menstrual cycle the FSH starts low and then gets higher down reaches a peak and then flass back down. LH starts on a similar course but then it goes up on day 14 this surge triggers ovulation. In the beginning the increased FSH causes the follucular cells to produce estrogen. The corpus luteum in turn starts producing increasingly higher levels of progesterone (as well as estrogen). "At the start of the cycle, the increasing levels of FSH bring about the maturation of the ovarian follicle. The follicular cells in turn produce increasing levels of estrogen. Just before day 14, the sharp increase in LH (and to a lesser extent FSH) causes ovulation. After the ovum leaves the follicle, the remaining cells turn into the corpus luteum (the “yellow body”). This is clue to the effect of LH. The corpus luteum in turn starts producing increasingly higher levels of progesterone (as well as estrogen). Notice that when the gonadal hormones are high, the gonadotropins, FSH and LH, are low (because of negative feedback)." (CK-12 Foundation 2015)