Roaring Twenties Magazine

Re-live the 1920's

Louis Armstrong: The Magical Musician

Jazz king, Louis Armstrong quickly became one of the most popular musicians in America. His unique individuality swept the nation and brought light to the African American Music community.

OUR TOP STORIES

Nativism

Politics

Warren G. Harding
Teapot Dome Scandal
Kellogg Briand Pact
Political Cartoon


Court Cases

Red Scare
Palmer Raids
Sacco & Vanzetti
Schenck vs. United States

Scopes Monkey Trial

John Scopes
Clarence Darrow
William Jennings Bryan
the outcome of the trial.

Innovations, Innovators & Culture
Aviation
Jazz Age
Henry Ford


Letter to the editor


Political Cartoon & Analysis

Nativism

Nativism is the protecting of rights of any native-born against immigrants. Following World War I, nativists in the 1920s focused their attention on Catholics, Jews, and southeastern Europeans, and realigned their beliefs behind racial and religious nativism. The KKK was meant to eliminate and kill everybody who was "different", such as blacks. This really put up a red flag and made everybody in the nation cautious of the severity of this terroristic group. The racial concern of the anti-immigration movement was linked closely to the eugenics movement that was sweeping the United States. In the 1920s, a wide national consensus sharply restricted the overall inflow of immigrants, especially those from southern and eastern Europe.

Politics

Warren G. Harding

(November 2, 1865 – August 2, 1923) was the 29th President of the United States, serving from March 4, 1921 until his death. Although Harding died one of the most popular presidents in history, the subsequent exposure of scandals that took place under him, such as Teapot Dome, eroded his popular regard, as did revelations of an affair by Nan Britton, one of his mistresses. In historical rankings of the U.S. presidents, Harding is often rated among the worst.

Teapot Dome Scandal

The Teapot Dome scandal was a bribery incident that took place in the United States from 1921 to 1922, during the administration of President Warren G. Harding.

Kellogg–Briand Pact

The Kellogg–Briand Pact is a 1928 international agreement in which signatory states promised not to use war to resolve disputes or conflicts of whatever nature or of whatever origin they may be, which may arise among them.
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Court Cases

Red Scare

A Red Scare is the promotion of fear of a potential rise of communism or radical leftism, used by anti-leftist proponents. In the United States, the First Red Scare was about worker (socialist) revolution and political radicalism.

Palmer Raids

The Palmer Raids were a series of raids by the United States Department of Justice intended to capture, arrest and deport radical leftists, especially anarchists, from the United States. The raids and arrests occurred in November 1919 and January 1920 under the leadership of Attorney General A. Mitchell Palmer.

Sacco and Venzetti

Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti were Italian born Us anarchist who were convicted of murdering a guard and a paymaster during the armed robbery of the Slater and Morrill Shoe Company, committed April 15, 1920, in South Braintree, Massachusetts, United States, and were executed by the electric chair seven years later at Charlestown State Prison. Both adhered to an anarchist movement that advocated relentless warfare against a violent and oppressive government.

Schenck Vs USA

During World War I, Schenck mailed circulars to draftees. The circulars suggested that the draft was a monstrous wrong motivated by the capitalist system. The circulars urged "Do not submit to intimidation" but advised only peaceful action such as petitioning to repeal the Conscription Act. Schenck was charged with conspiracy to violate the Espionage Act by attempting to cause insubordination in the military and to obstruct recruitment. Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes wrote the decision for the unanimous Supreme Court. It upheld Schenck's conviction, saying that it did not violate his First Amendment right to free speech.

Scopes Monkey Trial

John Scopes

John Thomas Scopes was a teacher in Dayton, Tennessee, who was charged on May 5, 1925 for violating Tennessee's Butler Act, which prohibited the teaching of evolution in Tennessee schools.

Clarence Darrow

Clarence Seward Darrow was an American lawyer, leading member of the American Civil Liberties Union, and prominent advocate for Georgist economic reform.

William Jennings Bryan

William Jennings Bryan was an American orator and politician from Nebraska, and a dominant force in the populist wing of the Democratic Party, standing three times as the Party's candidate for President of the United States.

outcome of the trial

July 21, 1925: Scopes 'Monkey Trial' Ends With Guilty Verdict. 1925: John Scopes, an unassuming high school biology teacher and part-time football coach, is found guilty of teaching evolution in schools, in violation of Tennessee law.

Innovations, Innovators & Culture

Aviation

The increased capabilities of 1920's planes also created the opportunity for daring men and women aviators to break and set aviation speed and distance records. They captured the imagination of the public who loved the flying machines and who followed their exploits, treating the pilots like royalty or movie stars. Crowds would be waiting to greet pilots after epic flights and huge street parades would be held in their honor where whole towns and cities turned out.

Jazz Age

The Jazz Age was a post World War I movement in the 1920's, from which jazz music and dance emerged. Although the era ended with the beginning of The Great Depression in the 1930's, jazz has lived on in American pop culture.

Henry Ford

An American industrialist, the founder of the Ford Motor Company, and the sponsor of the development of the assembly line technique of mass production.

Although Ford did not invent the automobile or the assembly line,[1] he developed and manufactured the first automobile that many middle class Americans could afford. In doing so, Ford converted the automobile from an expensive curiosity into a practical conveyance that would profoundly impact the landscape of the twentieth century. His introduction of the Model T automobile revolutionized transportation and American industry. As the owner of the Ford Motor Company, he became one of the richest and best-known people in the world. He is credited with "Fordism": mass production of inexpensive goods coupled with high wages for workers. Ford had a global vision, with consumerism as the key to peace. His intense commitment to systematically lowering costs resulted in many technical and business innovations, including a franchise system that put dealerships throughout most of North America and in major cities on six continents. Ford left most of his vast wealth to the Ford Foundation and arranged for his family to control the company permanently.

Letter to the editor

Re: Scopes Trial

John Scopes was found guilty of teaching evolution. He was only doing what teachers do and that is spreading their own knowledge and wisdom to their students. The trial could of taken place in another state where ideas are welcomed and people are open minded.
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It made for great oratory between eminent rivals, and it put the debate over teaching evolution on front pages across the country. But one thing the Scopes "monkey trial" of 1925 did not do was settle the contentious issue of evolution in the schools, which continues to incite strong passions and court actions to this day.

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