Ancient Roman FAQs

Venus Ingraham

Writing

There were 2 different methods they used for writing. The first one was that they used a pointed stick, called a stylus and wrote on clay, bark, animal skins, or wooded tablets loaded with wax. They were reusable. The other method was writing on papyrus, which was most commonly used. Ink was made from soot and vegetable gum or dye mixed with iron sulfate.

Family

Back then, the head of the family was the paterfamilias. (older father present) The father was able to do anything he wanted to really, including killing his wife, children, and slaves. Also, paterfamilias's mother or wife was also subject to absolute authority of the male head figure. The children were born at home and he father didn't acknowledge the babe until there were to be named 9 days later (for a boy) or 8 days later (if it were a girl). The child was then placed on the fathers feet and he decided whether he wanted to keep the child or not. If he walked away, it was put to death, but if e picked it up, he would raise him.

Clothing for boys and men

The men typically wore tunics, which is a 2 piece clothing of cloth sewn together. They also wore Togas, only if a boy was 16 years or older and was a free man. This shows their social class, structure, and duties. Men could also only wear one piece of jewelry, a ring, if they were even going too.

Clothing for girls and women

Women and girls wore Tunics over their undergarments. They had longer sleeves. Some had broad stripes on the tunic to identify marriage. Stolas were worn, which are colored shoes. Girls that wore a bunch of jewelry were engaged. The jewelry symbolized that they were taken and were showing off what their future husband gave them.

citations

"Books and Manuscripts." Ancient Greece and Rome: An Encyclopedia for Students. Ed. Carroll Moulton. Vol. 1. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1998. 98-100. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

"Family." The Greenhaven Encyclopedia of Ancient Rome. Don Nardo. San Diego: Greenhaven Press, 2002. 153-155. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.


"Children." World Eras. Ed. John T. Kirby. Vol. 3: Roman Republic and Empire, 264 B.C.E.- 476 C.E. Detroit: Gale, 2001. 304-305. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

WEISS, JESSICA. "Fathering and Fatherhood." Encyclopedia of Children and Childhood: In History and Society. Ed. Paula S. Fass. Vol. 2. New York: Macmillan Reference USA, 2004. 348-353. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015


"Names." The Greenhaven Encyclopedia of Ancient Rome. Don Nardo. San Diego: Greenhaven Press, 2002. 181-182. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

Tortora, Phyllis. "Toga." Encyclopedia of Clothing and Fashion. Ed. Valerie Steele. Vol. 3. Detroit: Charles Scribner's Sons, 2005. 329-331. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.


"Roman Clothing." Fashion, Costume, and Culture: Clothing, Headwear, Body Decorations, and Footwear Through the Ages. Ed. Sara Pendergast, et al. 2nd ed. Vol. 1: The Ancient World. Detroit: UXL, 2013. 157-174. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015


McManus, Barbara F. "Roman Clothing, Part I." Roman Clothing, Part I. VROMA, Aug. 2003. Web. 14 Sept. 2015.