The Klondike Gold Rush

By: Joanna G.

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The Map

1. The Yukon River (Navy Blue)

2. Lake Bennett

3. Chilkoot Trail

4. White Pass Trail

5. Dawson City

1. The Yukon River

The Yukon river (The Big Blue Line on the Map) had been thought to have gold in it. Sure enough, finer pieces of gold were panned for there.


News of gold in the Klondike traveled down the river to the towns along it.


Gold was found just in the Yukon Area anyway.

2. Lake Bennett

Lake Bennett (Bennett Lake) was where gold seekers arrived after crossing the Chilkoot Trail or White Pass. They made boats which they used to float down the Yukon river to then get to Dawson City. "Tent Cities" sprung up along its shore to plan for the eventual journey down to Dawson.

3. Chilkoot Trail

Also known as the "Golden Stairs", the "Chilkoot Trail" was traveled by over 30,000 people during the Klondike Gold Rush. Miners carried supplies along this trail that would sustain them for a year. Although the trail was only 35 miles it took months for the miners to get all the supplies they needed to their final destination (Lake Bennett).

4. White Pass Trail

The "White Pass Trail" is much like the "Chilkoot Trail". The trails both lead up steep hills. The "White Pass Trail" is also known as the "Dead Horse trail". This is because an estimated 3000 horses died on this trail. "White Pass Trail" was considered the gateway to Gold. The trail started in Skagway and ended in Dawson.

5. Dawson CIty

Dawson City was the heart of the Klondike Gold Rush. From 1896-1899 $29 million in gold was pulled from the ground around Dawson City. Because of the gold rush the population of Dawson City grew to around 30,000 (some argue 50,000). Most of the people came to mine gold, as money wouldn't be a problem since they could pay for things in gold.
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Ways of Getting to the Klondike

Seattle, Washington (the burgundy location marker) is where many people traveled to to then board a boat to get to Alaska (represented by the red arrows). Some people got there by other ways of transportation. Some trekked through the wilderness to then get to Dawson City, Yukon (represented by the orange arrows).

Where and When was Gold First Found?

The first gold was discovered on Augusts 16, 1896 in Bonanza Creek.

Early Birds

The "early birds" in the Klondike Gold Rush were people that staked claims to land so they pretty much "owned" that land to mine on. These people had a WAY better chance of finding gold than people who came later. The people who came later usually had to work for the people who had already staked claims so they would even have a remote chance of getting some gold.

Sources-

-http://content.lib.washington.edu/extras/goldrush.html

-http://www.historynet.com/klondike-gold-rush

-https://www.nps.gov/klgo/index.htm

"You can't wait for inspiration, you have to go after it with a club." -Jack London