Rom and Egypt comparison

Let's learn about Rom and Egypt

Egyptian death

If a king dies first they lay the king on a bench and start taking out the organs such as liver but not the heart because the king will need the heart for the after life, then they put salt on the body and scented perfumes and leave the body to dry for 40 days, then they wrap the king, finally they put the mummy in the tomb.

Roman death

The life expectancy of Ancient Romans was short and so death was a big part of Roman life. The Romans had a special place for death in their society which was partly due to their view of honour in life, which transcended into death. Although religion played a major part in Roman customs surrounding dying and death, certain protocols seemed to have been observed regardless of personal faith.

Egyptian housing


The ancient Egyptians made their houses using bricks made of chopped straw and mud. The mud was mixed with straw and then poured into molds which were then placed in the sun to bake into hard bricks. They white washed the walls using a mixture of lime and water and the rich homes varied from the homes of the poor in terms of the number of rooms and the flooring. The houses were also similar in appearance and had flat roofs.

Roman housing

Rich Romans would live in large partitioned houses with underground warming systems which they used during winter. The poor, however, lived in flats which they used mostly for sleeping and they ate in inns because cooking in the houses was not safe. They also had no electricity, so they were forced to use oil lamps for light.

Egyptian weapons

The spear was used since earliest times for hunting. In its form of javelin it was displaced early on by the bow and arrow. It continued to be employed as a lance in the hunt of lions and bulls, having a longer reach than other handheld weapons.


Unlike the other arms used by the ancient Egyptians, swords were a direct consequence of the introduction of metal. There are no stone predecessors of this kind of weapon. Axes, arrows and spears have a long wooden handle or shaft and a small cutting or piercing head which was fashioned of flint during the Neolithic.


The cutting axe is a blade fastened to a sizable handle, the idea being to keep as far as possible from harm's way. As relatively little power was exerted the affixing of the blade to the handle was not very critical. The head was generally inserted into a hole or groove in the wooden handle and tied fast.
The cutting axe is effective against enemies who do not wear body armour and helmets, as was the custom in Africa, Egypt included. It disappeared as armour became more prevalent, which happened later in Egypt than in Asia, where as early as the 3rd millennium BCE Sumerians are depicted wearing helmets.

Roman weapons

By the middle of the 1st century AD, the gladius had been replaced by the spatha (spada is the modern-day Italian word for sword). It had a much longer blade (60—80 cm123.6—3 1 .5in) and shorter point. The sword was Celtic in origin and it is probable that Gallic cavalry (from Gaul, in modern-day France), in the employ of Rome, introduced the sword to the Roman Army during the time of Julius Caesar (100—44Bc) and Augustus (63Bc—14). It was a slashing weapon and designed to be used by both the Roman cavalry and infantry.


By the time of the Roman Republic (c.509—44BC), the use of steel in the manufacture of swords was well advanced and Roman swordsmiths smelted iron ore and carbon in a bloomery furnace (the predecessor of the blast furnace). The temperatures in these furnaces could not achieve the high levels required to fully melt the iron ore, so the swordsmith had to work with pieces of slag (residue left after smelting) or bloom (mass consisting mostly of iron), which were then forged into the required blade shape. These pieces or strips of cooling metal were welded together for increased blade strength. During this process the owner’s initials or full name were sometimes engraved onto the blade.

Egyptian clothing

The Egyptians were great inventors and they made many objects that we still use today. They made objects like the shadoof, locks, paper, plows, medicine and eye make-up, an indication that they were highly skilled. Their paper, for example, was made out of papyrus, a plant very abundant in the Nile area. Another invention that changed the way the Egyptians lived was the first ox-drawn plow, which eased farming.


Roman clothing

Great Roman inventions included concrete, barrel vaults, architectural domes, special gangplanks used to secure and board ships during naval battles and articulated armoured plates. Roman scientific achievements are mostly in the areas of medicine and engineering for example, the many new ways to mine for metals like silver, gold and lead.

Egyptian inventions

The Egyptians were great inventors and they made many objects that we still use today. They made objects like the shadoof, locks, paper, plows, medicine and eye make-up, an indication that they were highly skilled. Their paper, for example, was made out of papyrus, a plant very abundant in the Nile area. Another invention that changed the way the Egyptians lived was the first ox-drawn plow, which eased farming.

Roman inventions

Great Roman inventions included concrete, barrel vaults, architectural domes, special gangplanks used to secure and board ships during naval battles and articulated armoured plates. Roman scientific achievements are mostly in the areas of medicine and engineering for example, the many new ways to mine for metals like silver, gold and lead.