MAIN IDEA SOCIAL STUDIES

By- G-22 Thay, Tina

Emancipation Proclamtion

The main idea of Emancipation Proclamtion is Abe Lincoln letting slaves free that were still fighting in the Union and letting African Americans join the Army or Navy or the Union.
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Thirteenth Amendment

The main idea of the Thirthteenth Amendment is that slaves can not be forced to work anymore. They have to be treated fairly and they can't be owned anymore unless it is a punishment for a crime.
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That is what ended slavery.

They are all important to U.S history.

Fourteenth Amendment

The main idea of the Fourteenth Amendment is that all slaves must be treated as U.S citizens. They are allowed to vote and they cannot be owned anymore. They have the right to be protected by the same laws. It also says that if someone has rebelled against America they cannot be elected for office
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Fifteenth Amendment

The main idea of the Fifteenth Amendment is that congress is not allowed to not let someone vote just because of their skin color. So they are allowed to vote even if they are black, white, asian, or mexican.
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Most of the amendments are about slavery

THIS IS HOW IT EFFECTED SLAVES

The amendments affected slaves in the South because it helped free them. It gave them equal rights. It made laws where they had to be treated like everyone else and nobody can own them anymore.
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WHAT LAW WOULD I MAKE TO PROTECT SLAVES?

If I were part of congress I would make a law that they all had to be treated fairly and that if you owned a slave you would be sent to jail. I would also make a law where the only way they are allowed to be hurt is if they were guilty of a crime.
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SLAVERY ENDED IN 1865

CONCLUSION

All people should be treated fairly. Nobody should be forced to work without pay. Nobody should be hurt or killed because of the color of their skin. Slavery should never be allowed again.

I got my information from

Alavosus, Laura M., Pat Sills, and Bert Bower. Social Studies Alive!: America's Past: Lesson Guide. Palo Alto, CA: Teachers' Curriculum Institute, 2010. Print.