Albinism

a rare genetic condition

Where it affects the body?

Albinism mostly affects the pigments in your skin, eyes, and even sometimes your hair! Pigments are the things that give you color in your skin, hair, and eyes. Without the pigments you don't have any color in your body. There are different types of albinism, oculocutaneous albinism and ocular albinism. Oculocutaneous albinism happens when both parents have an albinism gene in their body's and when it is passed on to the child they could have paler skin, pink eyes, or even whiter hair! Ocular albinism mainly affects your vision, you could have pink eyes and have seeing problems, you even might have to get eye surgery as well.
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Normal vs. Albinism What's Different?

Normal

  • Usually people without albinism have normal pigments in their bodys (colors).

  • They aren't as sensitive to the sun and don’t need as many dark clothing.

  • They don’t have as much eye problems as people with Albinism do.

  • Most people that don’t have Albinism usually don’t have white hair.

Albinism

  • People with Albinism have pink eyes and white hair because of lack of pigments.

  • They need to wear dark colored clothes

  • People with Albinism usually have eye troubles like blindness and eye surgery if needed


Who and Where is it most affected?

The most usual of ocular albinism is in males that inherit an albinism gene from their mothers but it is not very likely. Results show that 1 in 20,000 people get albinism. One type of Oculocutaneous albinism occurs more in africa and some native americans.

How do you get it?

You can only get it through an albinism gene that’s in your parents. One of them is Oculocutaneous albinism is when both parents have an albinism gene and when it is passed on to the child and the other is Ocular albinism.

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Works Citated

"Albino Redwood." : Photos, Diagrams & Topos : SummitPost. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 Jan. 2015.

N.p., n.d. Web. <http%3A%2F%2Fweb.b.ebscohost.com%2Fchc%2Fdetail%3Fsid%3D8870fe2b-32d0-427e-9f31-806b2a82e67a%2540sessionmgr115%26vid%3D0%26hid%3D105%26bdata%3DJnNpdGU9Y2hjLWxpdmU%253d%23db%3Dcmh%26AN%3DHL22573>.

"Oculocutaneous Albinism." Genetics Home Reference. N.p., n.d. Web. 18 Jan. 2015.

"TeensHealth." Albinism. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 Jan. 2015.

"White Elephant (animal)." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, n.d. Web. 21 Jan. 2015.