Leonardo Da Vinci

The Florentine Artist

Big image

"I have been impressed with the urgency of doing. Knowing is not enough; we must apply. Being willing is not enough; we must do."


  • Born: April 15, 1452 in Vinci, Italy
  • Died: May 02, 1519 in Amboise, France
  • Other Names: Leonardo di Ser Piero da Vinci; di Ser Piero da Vinci, Leonardo
  • Nationality: Florentine
  • Occupation: Artist

EARLY LIFE

  • "Born in Vinci, near Florence, Italy, Leonardo was the illegitimate son of Ser Piero da Vinci, a notary, and a peasant woman." -

Source : "Leonardo da Vinci." World of Earth Science. Ed. K. Lee Lerner and Brenda Wilmoth Lerner. Detroit: Gale, 2006. Biography in Context. Web. 4 May 2016.


  • Leonardo was raised in his father's home, and his father made sure Leonardo received an education in reading, writing, and arithmetic.


  • "Leonardo, for all his evident intelligence, proved a poor and distracted student; he received the arithmetical training known as "abacus school"" -

source : ROWLAND, INGRID. "Leonardo da Vinci." Europe, 1450 to 1789: Encyclopedia of the Early Modern World. Ed. Jonathan Dewald. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 2004. Biography in Context. Web. 6 May 2016.

GETTING INVOLVED

  • Leonardo never went to a university, and was sent to Florence at age 15 to become an apprentice painter for an Italian sculptor and painter named Andrea del Verrocchio.


  • "He studied with Verrocchio for several years, learning the fundamentals of painting and sculpting. In 1472, Leonardo was entered in the painter's guild in Florence and four years later was still mentioned as Verrocchio's assistant." -

source : "Leonardo da Vinci." Authors and Artists for Young Adults. Vol. 40. Detroit: Gale, 2001. Biography in Context. Web. 4 May 2016.

CHOICES & RESULTS

  • Leonardo had numerous notebooks that "consist of notes and jottings on various topics: mechanics, physics, anatomy, physiology, literature, and philosophy. They contain, moreover, plans and designs for machines that frequently have suggested Leonardo's "precursive genius." There are machines of war and of peace, flying machines based on the flight of birds, a parachute, a helicopter, tools and gadgets of all kinds. Leonardo's notebooks are also full of methodological notations on the procedures of scientific inquiry and philosophical considerations about the processes of nature." -

source : Abbagnano, Nicola. "Leonardo da Vinci." Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Gale, 2006. Biography in Context. Web. 6 May 2016.

  • Leonardo da Vinci won a commission for a painting of the Battle of Anghiari, commemorating a Florentine victory over Milan.


  • "Writing in Leonardo: A Portrait of the Renaissance Man, Roger Whiting noted of this landscape that is "is a masterpiece of the sfumato style, the blending of vague colors and shades to produce a misty appearance." Commenting also on the "delicate streaks of paint in the drapery and landscape" which "underline the sense of identity between the background and the foreground," Whiting further claimed that this reveals the true meaning of the painting: "nothing less than the genesis of the macrocosm and the microcosm, the birth of the world and mankind in the womb of time."" -

source : "Leonardo da Vinci." Authors and Artists for Young Adults. Vol. 40. Detroit: Gale, 2001. Biography in Context. Web. 4 May 2016.

IN HIS WORDS


  • “Beyond a doubt truth bears the same relation to falsehood as light to darkness.” – Leonardo Da Vinci



    “It had long since come to my attention that people of accomplishment rarely sat back and let things happen to them. They went out and happened to things.” – Leonardo Da Vinci

AFTERMATH


  • Leonardo was the "father of the modern age" and the visionary inventor of machines. In the night he would fill up endless notebooks, conjuring up the future.


  • “The American art critic Bernard Berenson wrote perhaps one of the soundest tributes to Leonardo in The Italian Painters of the Renaissance: "We forget that genius means mental energy, and that Leonardo, for the self-same reason that prevents his being merely a painter--the fact that it does not exhaust a hundredth part of energy--will, when he does turn to painting, bring to bear a power of seeing, feeling and rendering . . . utterly above that of the ordinary painter. . . . No, let us not join the reproaches made to Leonardo for having painted so little" -

source : "Leonardo da Vinci." Authors and Artists for Young Adults. Vol. 40. Detroit: Gale, 2001. Biography in Context. Web. 4 May 2016.

WORDS FOR HIM


  • "The term 'renaissance man' is always bandied about. I don't think that applies to me. You think about Leonardo da Vinci, and he was a painter and a physicist and an architect, and that is a true renaissance man." - Moby


  • "Leonardo Da Vinci combined art and science and aesthetics and engineering, that kind of unity is needed once again." - Ben Shneiderman

LEGACY

  • "Leonardo's thousands of sketches and notes focusing on both practical matters of his day and visions of future scientific accomplishments remain as a testament to Leonardo's prolific genius."

source : "Leonardo da Vinci." World of Earth Science. Ed. K. Lee Lerner and Brenda Wilmoth Lerner. Detroit: Gale, 2006. Biography in Context. Web. 4 May 2016.


  • His most famous/well known painting is the Mona Lisa, which shows a mysterious woman seemingly sitting in a chair with her hands in her lap and a slight smile, and a dark forest in the background.

Big image
  • His thousands of sketches and notes focusing on practical matters and visions of future accomplishments remain as a testament to Leonardo's prolific Genius.


  • "Leonardo da Vinci is regarded as the model Renaissance Man whose endeavors reflect his accomplishment in a variety of artistic and scientific disciplines" -

source : "Leonardo da Vinci." World of Invention. Gale, 2006. Biography in Context. Web. 6 May 2016.

ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY

  1. "Leonardo da Vinci." Gale Biography in Context. Detroit: Gale, 2010. Biography in Context. Web. 6 May 2016.
    This image shows a picture of Leonardo Da Vinci engraved by Cosmo Colombini. It was chosen because it shows what Leonardo supposedly looked like when he was alive.

  2. "Leonardo da Vinci." World of Earth Science. Ed. K. Lee Lerner and Brenda Wilmoth Lerner. Detroit: Gale, 2006. Biography in Context. Web. 4 May 2016.
    This source explains most of Leonardo's life when he was younger, and how often he incorporated mostly rivers and nature-related objects into his paintings. It was chosen because it spoke of his life choices and what he would put into his notebooks (like future-predictions.)

  3. ROWLAND, INGRID. "Leonardo da Vinci." Europe, 1450 to 1789: Encyclopedia of the Early Modern World. Ed. Jonathan Dewald. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 2004. Biography in Context. Web. 6 May 2016.
    This source really focused on Leonardo's life when he was in school and how he got his education after being seen by his father as a genius. It was chosen because it was one of the few biographies that actually described his school years.

  4. "Leonardo da Vinci." Authors and Artists for Young Adults. Vol. 40. Detroit: Gale, 2001. Biography in Context. Web. 4 May 2016.
    This article explains his early years and the places he went in life. It was chosen because it featured when he went to be an apprentice to a famous sculpture in Florence.

  5. "Da Vinci's Design Takes Flight." Morning Edition 28 Apr. 2008. Biography in Context. Web. 6 May 2016.
    This video explains his views on the future and things such as flight. It was chosen because it contained what he predicted for future life and how he is represented as the man who actually predicted later life.

  6. Abbagnano, Nicola. "Leonardo da Vinci." Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Gale, 2006. Biography in Context. Web. 6 May 2016.
    This encyclopedia goes into detail about his notebooks and his ideas on the future. It was chosen because it explained what he mainly put into his notebooks and how he had ideas of people flying in the early 1400's.

  7. "Video: Da Vinci On Display." Local Broadcast Video Content 27 Nov. 2013. Biography in Context. Web. 6 May 2016.
    This video shows his art pieces throughout the years that he had created. It was chosen because it shows how creative he was with all of his pieces and how they turned out to be after put on display.

  8. "Mona Lisa, Leonardo da Vinci's Masterpiece, Circa 16th Century." Gale Biography in Context. Detroit: Gale, 2010. Biography in Context. Web. 6 May 2016.
    This piece by Leonardo da Vinci shows a young woman sitting infront of a darker landscape to emphasize her bright, yet dull features. It was chosen to show one of Leonardo's most famous pieces, Mona Lisa, that almost everyone thinks of when they hear 'Leonardo da Vinci'.

  9. "Leonardo da Vinci." World of Invention. Gale, 2006. Biography in Context. Web. 6 May 2016.
    This article talks about Leonardo's accomplishments and what he is remembered as, the 'Renaissance Man". It was chosen because out of many articles, this was one that really emphasized on all of his accomplishments throughout his lifetime.

  10. Baxter, Kathleen. "Leonardo Da Vinci: master draftsman. (Nuts & bolts: resources and practical information for artists)." American Artist Apr. 2003: 56. Biography in Context. Web. 6 May 2016.
    This magazine describes what Leonardo did for his art and how he did most of it, including his lifetime achievements. It was chosen because it talked about what he did out of many sources, and what he achieved after everything, even after death and how he was remembered.