Barbara Jordan

"For all of its uncertanity, we cannot flee the future"

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About her life

Born on February 21, 1936, in Houston, Texas, Barbara was a lawyer and a educator.Barbara went to Texas Southern University and Boston University Law.Then she also became the first ever African American woman to be elected to the senate in 1966. Sadly in 1996 Barbara passed away at the age of sixty.

Growing up

Barbara grew up in a poor neighborhood. Her father Benjamin Jordan was a Baptist minister and a warehouse clerk. As for her Mother Arlyne Jordan she was a maid,housewife and a church teacher. Her parents knew Barbra could be so much more so they pushed her to excel in her academic fields. In high school is when her excellence in language and building arguments started to show. (which would later help her with being a educator and lawyer). Also in highschool she was a award winning debater and public speaker. After that she later went on to graduate Texas Southern University and Boston University Law school

Politcal life

In 1962 Jordan launched her first proposal to be in the Texas Legislature at the first try she was denied entry, but no that did not stop Barbara. So in 1966 she did it again and landed a spot in the Texas Legislature making African American history and Women's. Many people had their doubts about Jordan when she came many did not think a African American Woman could do it, but it did not take long before most of them had Jordan's back. Barbara also wanted to help her constituents by helping usher through the first states law on minimum wage. Barbara was working at a great extent the hardest she has ever and eventually her fellow workers. Voted her president pro tempore of the texas senate. Jordan is the first African American to hold this post.

FUN FACT!

In the late 1950's Barbara pledged in the sorority Delta Sigma Theta which is known for educated women who are putting a emphasis on things targeting the African American community.

Taking another step

In 1972 Jordan won a election into the US House Of Representatives.As a member of the House Judicary Committiee.Then she was put into the the national spolight with the Watergate Scandal. Then at the 1976 Democratic National convention she said for her keynote "My presence here . is one additional bit of evidence that the American dream need not forever be deferred." After this Jordan kept working on her political career.Next she announced she would not be requesting reelection. In 1979 she finished her last term. Jordan at this time was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis at the time. Finishing her political career she then decided to turn her attention towards educating future politicians and public officials taking a professorship at the University Of Texas At Austin.

Barbara Jordan Keynote address to 1976 Democratic National Convention

Barbara Jordan Keynote Address to 1976 Democratic National Convention

Later Years

Barbara was still working even though now her health was crumbling she served as a special counsel on ethics for Texas governor Ann Richards in 1991 and had to serve it in a wheelchair. The following year she decided to make a speech at the Democratic Convention once again. In 1994 Bill Clinton honored her with the presidential honor award for freedom. Two years later she passed away from pneumonia and her battle with leukemia. People will honor her forever with many statues and monuments made for her.

Statue honoring Barbara at the University of Texas Austin Campus

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"There was simply something about her that made you proud to be a part of the country that produced her," - Ann Richards

"Barbara always stirred our national conscience."- President Bill Clinton

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Biblography

Barbara Jordan. (n.d.). Retrieved May 26, 2016, from http://www.biography.com/people/barbara-jordan-9357991

Statue Honoring Barbara Jordan Unveiled on The University of Texas at Austin Campus. (2009). Retrieved May 26, 2016, from https://news.utexas.edu/2009/04/24

History.com Staff. (2009). Barbara C. Jordan. Retrieved May 26, 2016, from http://www.history.com/topics/black-history/barbara-c-jordan

The forgotten Barbara Jordan Commission on Immigration. (n.d.). Retrieved May 26, 2016, from http://www.vdare.com/posts/the-forgotten-barbara-jordan-commission-on-immigration