WANTED: EINSTEINIUM

BOUNTY: $27,000,000

WANTED FOR:

Einsteinium, an element found after a nuclear explosion that occurred 50 years ago in the Pacific Ocean. It is currently wanted for causing hair loss, asthma, fatigue, skin problems, and nausea. Einsteinium is topically used for the study of how radioactive decay occurs because of chemical consequences. It is really important if a chemical warfare was going to occur. Today, scientists are finding new uses for Einsteinium.

ALIASES:

There are no known aliases for Einsteinium. The origin of how Einsteinium got its name was just what the "explorer" of the element , Albert Ghiorso, wanted to name it.

DESCRIPTIONS:

Color: Silvery-White

Atomic Number: 99

Atomic Mass: 252 u

Metal or Non-Metal?: Has physical properties of a metal

Room Temperature Appearance: Solid

STRUCTURE:

BOHR DIAGRAM

FIRST ARRESTING OFFICER; WHO DISCOVERED IT?

The person who discovered Einsteinium was a man named Albert Ghiorso. Albert Ghiorso was born on July 15,1915 in Vallejo, California. As a teenager, he built radio circuitry and earned a reputation for making radio contacts at distances that exceeded the military. Ghiorso invented numerous techniques and machines for isolating and identifying heavy elements atom-by-atom. He was important to the research of the periodic table because he was a co-discoverer of 12 chemical elements.

REPORT OF FIRST ARREST:

In 1952, Einsteinium was first examined when scientists extracted coral from a nuclear bomb test located in the Eniwetok Atoll, a ring-shaped island that is found in the Pacific Ocean. One of the scientists that extracted coral saw a strange residue on pieces of the coral. The residue was sought out to be a very rare source of radiation. The scientist who founded this residue (Albert Ghiorso) later named it Einsteinium.

LAST SEEN:

ON THE PERIODIC TABLE: Last seen between Californium (atomic number 98) and Fermium (atomic number 100)

GROUP: Synthetic Transuranic Element

FAMILY: Actinide

KNOWN ASSOCIATES:

There are elements that react with Einsteinium, but none have been tested. Since it is so rare to obtain and very expensive, scientists want to preserve as much as they can until they have knowledge on how to create it. Until then, there will not be any tests.

WARNING LABEL:

THE ELEMENT IN ITS ORIGINAL FORM IS VERY DANGEROUS. IT CAN CAUSE HAIR LOSS, FATIGUE, SKIN PROBLEMS, NAUSEA, AND ASTHMA.
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BIBLIOGRAPHY:

  • Greenwood, Norman N.; Earnshaw, Alan (1997). Chemistry of the Elements (2nd ed.). Butterworth–Heinemann.
  • Haire, Richard G. (2006). "Einsteinium". In Morss, Lester R.; Edelstein, Norman M.; Fuger, Jean. (PDF). 3 (3rd ed.). Dordrecht, the Netherlands: Springer.
  • Holleman, Arnold F. & Wiberg, Nils (2007). Textbook of Inorganic Chemistry (102nd ed.). Berlin: de Gruyter.
  • Seaborg, G.T., ed. (23 January 1978). Proceedings of the Symposium Commemorating the 25th Anniversary of elements 99 and 100
  • BY: JOEY GARCIA