Range of Placements

TVDSB

Variety of Special Education Delivery Models

The Thames Valley District School Board’s Special Education delivery system includes a continuum of Special Education programs and services. It is a delivery system based upon the needs of the child that strives to match the student with appropriate programs and services.


This continuum includes:


  • Regular classrooms with support, accommodations and/or modifications. The curriculum, method of presentation, instructional strategies and/or classroom environments may be areas of accommodations and modifications.
  • Self-contained classrooms in which educational programs are provided for part or all of the school day, in order to meet the identified needs of the child.
  • Programs in the child’s home school, or in another school or setting, in which educational programs are provided to meet the identified needs of the child.
  • Services in other locations as determined by the child’s needs, when such services are not available in the home school. These services may include, but are not limited to, special programs in which educational services are provided in order to meet the needs of the child.
  • Building Each Tomorrow lies at the heart of the programs and services that the TVDSB provides through its Special Education department. What has developed is a multi-sourced support model dedicated to the student. This model illustrates how different stakeholders, both individuals and groups, play integral roles in maximizing student learning

SPECIFIC RANGE OF PLACEMENTS OFFERED

PLACEMENT OFFERED

DESCRIPTION


BEHAVIOUR

Students with behavioural issues may receive support in the following settings:

· In a regular class on an IEP, Safety Plan or Individual Behaviour Plan (IBP). Supports may include:

- In-classroom assistance;

- In-school resource withdrawal.

Behaviour support/assistance is available to both elementary and secondary schools to support students with behavioural challenges in the regular classroom and in consultation with system staff.


AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDER (ASD)

Criteria for placement in an ASD class:

· A student who:

o Has been diagnosed with ASD;

o Requires a higher level of structured monitoring, individual attention and planning around their particular learning style and modification to the environment;

o Has had ongoing interventions in a regular classroom placement which have not been successful; and o Is capable of accessing curriculum with accommodations and/or modifications to expectations and the learning environment

· In a regular class on an IEP.

Supports may include:

o In-classroom assistance;

o In-school resource withdrawal; or

o Support from the Itinerant ASD Resource Team and/or Speech and Language Services.

The Itinerant ASD Resource Team, using a multi-disciplinary approach, acts as a resource to the school-based PDT. The team is accessed through the Learning Coordinator-Special Education, and is available for any student in need who has been diagnosed as having ASD.

Placement in a self-contained class must be recommended through the system IPRC process. The purpose of this class is to:

o Address the needs of students diagnosed with ASD with deficits in information processing and/or environmental confusion to such a high degree of stress that the student is unable to function in a regular class; and

o Modify the environment and provide methods of instruction that are Applied Behaviour Analysis (ABA) based and compatible with the student’s learning style thereby enabling the student to experience academic, social and communication growth and generalize those skills in their home school setting.

· In an ASD resource program at the secondary level. Placement in a resource program must be recommended through the system IPRC process.

o Students must be capable of working towards successfully completing secondary school credits;


HEARING IMPAIRMENT

Criteria for placement in a Hearing Impaired class:

· A student who:

o Is identified as Hearing Impaired;

o Is recommended to the program through the IPRC process; and

o Requires a specialized program to address specific needs related to hearing impairment.

· In a regular class on an IEP.

Supports may include:

o Support from an Itinerant Hearing Resource Teacher;

o Access to Audiological services; and

o Resource support from a Specialist Teacher of the Deaf at the secondary level.

· In a self-contained class with program provided by a Specialist Teacher of the Deaf at the elementary level. Placement in a self-contained class must be recommended through the system IPRC process. The purpose of this class is to:

o Provide support from a specialist teacher to students with hearing impairments;

o Help students develop speech and language skills;

o Foster self-esteem and independence;

o Provide development of auditory-verbal skills;

o Develop skills in use and management of amplification equipment; and

o Provide strategies for students to return to a regular classroom.


SPEECH AND LANGUAGE IMPAIRMENT

Students identified with speech and language impairments (fluency, voice, articulation and/or language disorders) receive support in any school setting:

· In a regular class on an IEP. Supports may include:

o Support from Speech-Language Pathologists; and

o Referral to Community Care Access Centre (CCAC) for students with speech only or swallowing needs that meet the Ministry of Health guidelines. Speech-Language Pathologists provide the following services: o Assistance with the development of the IEP;

o Assessments, screenings and observations;

o Resource withdrawal intervention (which can be individual, in pairs or in group format);

o Other intervention services include:

§ Mediator-based support of Educational Assistants (EAs);

§ In-class interventions;

§ Home programming to support carry-over of communication goals to student’s home and other community settings; and

§ Consultation and collaboration with classroom teachers; and

§ Recommendations for assistive technology.


LEARNING DISABILITY

· In a regular class on an IEP. Supports may include:

o In-classroom assistance, differentiated instruction, on-going assessment; o In-school resource withdrawal; and

o Support from the LD Resource Team and/or Speech-Language Pathology Services use of Assistive Technology.

· In a self-contained Accelerate Class or an Intensive Support Class (ISC). Placement in a self-contained class may be recommended at the late Primary/Junior (Grade 4, 5 or 6) level through the system IPRC process. The purpose of the Accelerate Class (grade 4, 5 or 6) is to:

o Provide a one (1) year placement to support students who are experiencing severe academic difficulties, primarily in the areas of reading, writing and language; o Foster self-esteem and independence;

o Provide intensive remedial instruction to compensate for severe reading, writing and language deficits; and

o Provide strategies for students to return to a regular classroom.


GIFTED

· A student who:

o Is identified as Gifted;

o Possesses documented evidence that ongoing interventions in a regular class have been insufficient to meet the student’s needs;

o Demonstrates signs of low self-esteem, poor motivation, and/or emotional fragility which make it unlikely that the student will thrive in the regular classroom; and

o May exhibit exceptionally high performance beyond the grade level expectations in numerous subjects which makes intervention in the regular class difficult.

· In a regular class on an IEP. Supports may include:

o In-classroom curriculum-related enrichment opportunities;

o Consultation with an Itinerant Gifted Resource Teacher; and

o Participation in the Itinerant Gifted Program at the elementary level.

· In a self-contained Gifted class. Placement in a self-contained Gifted class may be recommended at the grade 5, 6, 7, 8 level through the system IPRC process.

The purpose of this class is to:

o Provide differentiated learning experiences of depth and breadth beyond those which can be provided in regular school programs;

o Provide the necessary social support and stimulation of peers of similar intellectual abilities;

o Provide an environment in which there is ongoing curriculum-based assessment as required; and

o Provide the necessary transition planning and skills for successful entry into secondary school.

· Through Gifted lines at the secondary level. Secondary schools with Gifted students are given extra staffing allocations in order to address the needs of identified Gifted students.


MILD INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY

Students identified with a Mild Intellectual Disability may receive support in the following setting:

· In a regular class on an IEP. [Supports may include:

o In-classroom assistance;

o In-school resource withdrawal; and

o Consultation with the Learning Coordinator–Special Education.


DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITY

Criteria for placement in a DE self-contained class:

· A student who:

o Has been diagnosed with Developmental Disability;

o Requires a higher level of structured monitoring, individual attention and planning around their particular learning style and modification to the environment;

o Has had ongoing interventions in a regular classroom placement which have not been successful; and o Is not capable of accessing curriculum with accommodations and/or modifications to expectations and the learning environment

· In a regular class on an IEP. Supports may include:

o In-classroom assistance;

o In-school resource withdrawal; and

o Support from the Developmental Education (DE) TOSA Team and/or Speech Language Pathology Services.

· In a self-contained Developmental Education (DE) class. Placement in a self-contained class must be recommended through the system IPRC process. The purpose of this class is to:

o Address the needs of students diagnosed with Developmental Disability and the student is unable to function in a regular class;

o Modify the environment and provide methods of instruction that are compatible with the student’s learning style thereby enabling the student to experience academic, social and communication growth; and

o Provide integration opportunities for students based on IEP goals within the wider school community.

o Provide a bridge between school and community with a strong focus on work skills, life skills, leisure and recreational skills;

o A student’s program may be a blend of alternative curriculum and work-place training, individualized to match strengths, interests and needs; and

o Members of the staff include teachers who coordinate the program, EAs and other system support staff as required.


PHYSICAL DISABILITY

· In a regular class on an IEP.

Supports may include:

o In-classroom assistance;

o Consultation with a Learning Coordinator–Special Education; and

o On-going and/or consultative services from other agencies. Modifications for students with physical disabilities may include specialized equipment or furniture and assistance of support staff, in addition to appropriate curriculum modifications. Outside agencies such as Thames Valley Children’s Centre (TVCC) and the CCAC may provide ongoing and/or consultative services.

A student in a regular class with physical and/or multiple disabilities may be transported to a school or facility other than their home school, if the home school does not have the appropriate plant modifications and/or specialized equipment and facilities to meet the student’s needs.

A student with multiple disabilities, which include developmental and physical disabilities or physical and other health-related concerns, may be transported to a self-contained developmental class located in a school or facility which has appropriate plant modifications and/or specialized equipment and facilities to meet the student’s needs.


VISUAL IMPAIRMENT

· In a regular class on an IEP. Supports may include:

o In-classroom assistance;

o Support from a transcriber and/or orientation and mobility trainer, EA; and

o Support from an Itinerant Vision Resource Teacher.

The Itinerant Vision Resource Teacher reviews the student’s needs, makes recommendations for strategies to support learning, works directly with students, and monitors the student’s progress and continuing needs. Occasional and/or ongoing school based inservice may be provided. Specific program accommodations may include: o Preferential seating; o Specialized equipment or materials; o Orientation and mobility training; o Braille instruction, tactile instruction; and o Adapted instructional materials.

· In a Provincial School for the Blind.


ALTERNATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAMS AND SUPERVISED ALTERNATIVE LEARNING (SAL)

WD SUTTON SCHOOL – SECTON 23 PROGRAMS

WD Sutton School (Section 23) was officially opened on 1979 September 18 to provide an administrative umbrella under which the various educational programs in the community’s care, treatment and correctional facilities could be coordinated. These facilities support students with behavioural and emotional needs. The TVDSB currently has thirteen (13) sites under WD Sutton School.

Identifying a Student with Exceptionality

The Thames Valley District School Board (TVDSB) considers assessment as an integral part of the instructional process. Classroom teachers and Learning Support Teachers (LSTs) regularly use educational assessments to determine student achievement and student progress. Psychoeducational consultants and Speech-Language Pathologists conduct specialized assessments to determine learning needs.


School based Assessments:

Support Services Referral Form is completed - http://www.tvdsb.ca/files/288516/support%20services%20referral%20form.pdf


Program Development Team (PDT) meeting is called. School-based educational assessment conducted by a qualified staff member (academic assessment, speech-language assessment, psychological assessment, etc.).

Parents or Guardian contacted and Principal discusses: the needs/concerns for the student, referral for assessment, description of assessment, how results will be shared, how the results will be used to enhance proramming, obtain permission to proceed.


Follow up PDT Meeting for the In School Assessment:

The LST and/or other qualified staff member shares the results of the assessment with the PDT and with parent(s)/legal guardian(s); and ∙ After considering the results of the assessment recommended student continues on tracking/monitoring records of the PDT. Or moving to a system support services.


System Support Service PDT Meeting:

At this PDT Meeting the Team May Recommend

∙ That the student’s progress be monitored for at least the next three (3) months with the new program plan in place and reviewed within at least three (3) months’ time to determine if current needs are being addressed or if further interventions are required. ∙ That the student’s needs indicate that it would be beneficial for that student to move the IPRC.

∙ That an Individual Education Plan (IEP) be developed.

School Staff and Support Staff

In-school (PDT Meetings and Assessments)

Classroom Teachers (Referring Teacher)

Teachers for self-contained classes

Other Special Education teachers: Itinerant Teachers (ASD, Gifted, Hearing, Vision)

Educational Assistants

Learning Support Teacher

Support Personel

Principal

Parents


IPRC

Professional Resource staff

Board Personnel

Sample Outline of IPRC Meeting

At the IPRC Meeting:

Principal/Designate:

• Chairs the meeting; • Explains the role of the Committee; • Invites each person present with knowledge of the student to present information; and • Considers information relevant to the student’s needs and strengths.

Referring Teacher(s):

• Presents all relevant information that supports identification (or not).

Learning Support Teacher:

• Presents all relevant information that supports identification (or not).

Support Personnel:

• May be invited to attend to review any recent assessments; and • Act as a resource to assist in the interpretation of reports from other agencies

Parent(s)/Legal Guardian(s):

• Shares any available reports with principal; • May arrange for a representative to attend the meeting to speak on their behalf or support them; • Provides any further information; and • Asks questions as they arise.


At the IPRC Meeting, the Committee May Choose

• To recommend identification (or not); • To recommend initial placement in regular class on an IEP; • To recommend continued placement in a regular class on an IEP; • To demit a student no longer in need of Special Education services; or • To defer decision if the Committee requires more information

Critical Analysis

The Thames Valley District School Board represents exemplary practice in its approach to assessment and placement of students. It provides programs and services for about 19,000 special needs students. About 50% of these students have been identified as exceptional through the IPRC process. The need in the TVDSB area is greater than other boards throughout Ontario, with the high quality of local children’s health and education services offered to parents with special needs children.