Toxicology

Controlled Substances

Controlled Substance -

  • Generally a drug or chemical whose manufacture, possession, or use is regulated by a government, such as illicitly used drugs or prescription medications that are designated a Controlled Drug.

Five Different Controlled Substances

  • The Love Drug
  • Testosterone
  • Oxycodone
  • Morphine
  • Marijuana

How was it used....

It was used in 1953 by the US Army in psychological warfare tests, and then resurfaced in the 1960s as a psychotherapy medication to “lower inhibitions". Now it's used as a "party drug"

How it can be Abused....

  • Short-Term Effects- Faintness, chills or sweating, muscle tension, impaired judgment, depression, blurred vision, sleep problems, false sense of affection, nausea, severe anxiety, drug craving, involuntary teeth clenching, confusion, paranoia.
  • Long-Term Effects-Prolonged use causes long-lasting and perhaps permanent damage to the brain, affecting the person’s judgment and thinking ability.
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How it is used....

Used in men and boys to treat conditions caused by a lack of this hormone, such as delayed puberty, impotence, or other hormonal imbalances and in women to treat breast cancer that has spread to other parts of the body.

How it can Be abused....

Take too much and use it continuously over a long period of time can cause the body to stop producing the levels of testosterone it needs naturally. Shrunken testicles are the classic long-term effect of abuse
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Oxycodone

How it is used....

It's used to relieve pain from injuries, arthritis, cancer, and other conditions.

How it can be abused....


  • Short-Term Effects- Slightly euphoric state of mind. Even if you are taking the drug as prescribed, it’s possible to get high on Oxycodone. This drug lifts your mood slightly and lessens anxiety, which can make it attractive to people who suffer from depression or anxiety.
  • Long-Term Effects-
  • Restlessness
  • Muscle and bone pain
  • Muscle spasms
  • Insomnia
  • Diarrhea and vomiting
  • Chills and goose bumps
  • Intense anxiety

Benefits of using testosterone properly....

You gain muscle mass
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What is the Federal Analog Act?

Federal Analog Act-

is a section of the United States Controlled Substance Act passed in 1986 which allowed any chemical "substantially similar" to a controlled substance listed in Schedule I or II to be treated as if it were also listed in those schedules, but only if intended for human consumption. These similar substances are often called designer drugs.

Consequences for abusing a controlled substance....

Schedule II drugs have the highest potential for abuse. Abuse of Schedule II drugs may lead to severe psychological or physical dependence. Examples include morphine, oxycodone, and methadone.

Schedule III drugs have less potential for abuse than the drugs or other substances in schedules I and II. Abuse of Schedule III drugs may lead to moderate or low physical dependence or high psychological dependence. Examples include anabolic steroids, codeine and hydrocodone with aspirin or Tylenol®, and certain barbiturates.

Schedule IV drugs have a low potential for abuse relative to the drugs or other substances in Schedule III. Abuse of Schedule IV drugs may lead to limited physical dependence or psychological dependence compared with Schedule III drugs. Examples include Valium®and Xanax®.

Schedule V drugs have a low potential for abuse relative to the drugs or other substances in Schedule IV. Abuse of Schedule V drugs may lead to limited physical dependence or psychological dependence compared with Schedule IV drugs. Cough medicines with codeine are examples of Schedule V drugs.