Assessments for Learning

By Penelope Moore

The Five Strategies of Assessment Approaches for an Effective Classroom Environment

Strategy 1: Clarifying, Understanding and Sharing Learning Intentions
Strategy 2: Engineering Effective Classroom Discussions, Tasks and Activities that Elicit Evidence of Learning
Strategy 3: Providing Feedback that Moves Learners Forward
Strategy 4: Activating Students as Learning Sources for One Another
Strategy 5: Activating Students as Owners of their Learning

Strategy 1: The Big Five: Focus on the Major Skills of the Curriculum

Analytical: Logical Reasoning
Conceptual: Mental Concepts
Information Management: Collection of Information from One of More Sources
Communication: Exchanging Information
Meta-Cognitive: Learning Engagement Including Planning, Monitoring, Comprehension, and Evaluation

Strategies Explained

Strategy 1: Clarifying, Understanding and Sharing Learning Intentions
  • Show Different Examples of work
  • The Big Five Focus on the Major Skills of the Curriculum
Strategy 2: Engineering Effective Classroom Discussions, Tasks and Activities that Elicit Evidence of Learning
  • Multi-Participant Questions:
- Where Students Answer questions simultaneously on Mini-white boards or by Multiple choice questions.
  • No Hands Up:

- Activate all students by using "Hands Up" only to let students ask questions and not for answering them.

  • Flipped Classroom:

- Summarize the content of lessons in film clips which students watch to prepare for the lesson.

- Lessons used for conversations and dialogues between teacher and students about the content of the lesson.

Strategy 3: Providing Feedback that Moves Learners Forward

  • Two Stars and A Wish:

- Feedback which focuses on two things that the student has done well and one area which needs to be improved.

- The best feedback is not the feedback given to the students, but the one given to the teacher.

- Collect and read the work of the class, then plan and adjust your next lessons to match student needs.

Strategy 4: Activating Students as Learning Sources for One Another

  • Pre-flight Checklist:

- Use check lists to support the feedback that students give to each other.

  • Green, Yellow, Red:

- Have Students demonstrate how well they understand the content of the lesson.

Green: I understand and can explain

Yellow: I have difficulties understanding

Red: You have lost me

- Take a break so that Green students can help the red students while the teacher explains to the yellow students.

Strategy 5: Activating Students as Owners of their Learning

  • See Three Before Me:

- Train students to always check with three different sources before asking the teacher for help

- Students keep a logbook in which they reflect on their learning.

Assessment for learning

References

Hall, K., & Burke, W. M. (2003). Making formative assessment work [electronic resource] : effective practice in the primary classroom / Kathy Hall and Winnifred M. Burke. Maidenhead : Open University Press, 2003.

Rystad, M. (2013, April 7). Assessment for learning [Video file]. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HcLMlY6R7RM

Yu, H., & Li, H. (2014). Group-based formative assessment: a successful way to make summative assessment effective. Theory And Practice In Language Studies, (4), 839.