Alkaline Earth Metals

Jackson Meadows, Timmy Wetmore, Mason Mcghee, and John Hade

Basic information

Beryllium

Ba

4

+2 valence electrons

Melting point: 2348 degrees fahrenheit, (1287 degrees celsius)

Discovered 1797 Louis-Nicholas Vauquelin


Magnesium

Mg

12

+2 valence electrons

melting point: 1202 degrees fahrenheit (650 degrees celsius)

Discovered 1755, Joseph Black


Calcium

Ca

20

+2 valence electrons

Melting point 1548 degrees fahrenheit (842 degrees celsius)

Discovered 1808 Humphry Davey


Strontium

Sr

38

+2 valence electrons

Melting Point: 1,416°F (768.8°C)

Discovered 1790 Martin Heinrich


Barium

Ba

56

+2 valence electrons

Melting Point: 1,341 degrees Fahrenheit (727 degrees Celsius)

Discovered 1808 Humphry Davey


Radium

Ra

88

+2 valence electrons

melting point 1292 degrees fahrenheit (700 degrees celsius)

Discovered 1898 Pierre Curie, Marie Curie



More Information

Magnesium and Calcium are very common in foods and dietary supplements. Barium and Beryllium are commonly used in jewelry and medicine. Strontium is one of the main ingredients used to make fireworks. Radium is almost never used outside of labs because of it’s high levels of radioactivity


These elements are all grouped together because the group 2 elements are all metals with a shiny, silvery-white color.


  • An oxidation number of +2 which makes them very reactive

  • Not found freely in nature

  • Present in the earth's crust but not in their basic form

  • Distributed in rock structure

  • Two electrons in their outer shell

  • High boiling points

  • High melting points

  • Low density

  • Low electron affinity

  • Low electronegativity

  • Silver in color

  • Ductile

  • Malleable

  • React easily with the halogen

  • Softer and stronger than most other metals (except the alkali metals)