The Battle of Gettysburg

The turning Point of the War

Date of the battle

The battle took place on July 1, 2, and 3rd of the year 1863.

The significance of the battle

The significance of the battle was that it was the turning point of the Civil war for one main reason: the plan Robert E. Lee had to invade the North and force an end to the war failed.

Some Facts about the battle

As many as 51,000 soldiers from both armies after the war were either killed, wounded, captured or missing at the end of the three day battle.

Battle Summary

On July 3, Lee ordered an attack by fewer than 15,000 troops on the enemy’s center at Cemetery Ridge. The assault, known as “Pickett’s Charge,” managed to pierce the Union lines but eventually failed, at the cost of thousands of rebel casualties, and Lee was forced to withdraw his battered army toward Virginia on July 4.

Aftermass and Casualties of the battle

Union casualties in the battle numbered 23,000, while the Confederates had lost some 28,000 men–more than a third of Lee’s army. The North rejoiced while the South mourned, its hopes for foreign recognition of the Confederacy erased.

Demoralized by the defeat at Gettysburg, Lee offered his resignation to President Jefferson Davis, but was refused. Though the great Confederate general would go on to win other victories, the Battle of Gettysburg (combined with Ulysses S. Grant’s victory at Vicksburg, also on July 4) irrevocably turned the tide of the Civil War in the Union’s favor.

Bibliography

"The Battle of Gettysburg." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, n.d. Web. 02 Dec. 2014.


"The Battle of Gettysburg." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, n.d. Web. 02 Dec. 2014.


"Battle of Gettysburg." History.com. A&E Television Networks, n.d. Web. 02 Dec. 2014.


"The Battle of Gettysburg." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, n.d. Web. 02 Dec. 2014.

Council on Foreign Relations. Council on Foreign Relations, n.d. Web. 02 Dec. 2014.


"Battle of Gettysburg." History.com. A&E Television Networks, n.d. Web. 02 Dec. 2014.