CDC worker

Study of infectious monocleosis

What is a CDC worker

CDC stands for centers for disease control but there are many jobs in the CDC a CDC worker wears protective gear when studying and dealing with very deadly disease such as Ebola if they don't wear this protective they will most likely get the disease they are dealing with and CDC workers also help us learn more about extremely dangerous disease

My job in the CDC

I'm a medical officer in the CDC I provide advice and administer, supervise, or perform professional and scientific work in one or more medical fields, such as preventive medicine, occupational health, and maternal and child health medical officers also conduct research on health problems, physical limitations, and injuries, including causes and methods or prevention and control

Seven most common asked questions about infectious monocleosis and its answers

Question 1.) What affect dose infectious monocleosis cause?

Answer 1.) Infectious monocleosis usually causes swollen lymph nodes in the neck area

Question 2.) Describe the type of pathogen that causes infectious mosmonocleosis?

Answer 2.) Infectious monocleosis caused by Epstein-Barr virus

Question 3.) How dose this disease spread?

Answer 3.) Infectious monocleosis spreads through saliva some people call it the kissing diseas

Question 4.) Where is the disease most prevalent and why is it seen there?

Answer 4.) Infectious monocleosis spreads through saliva exchange so its inside of everyone

Question 5.) Historical information regarding past and present outbreaks of this disease

Answer 5.) There has not yet been an outbreak of this disease

Question 6.) Provide information on the use of vaccines and/or medications

Answer 6.) There are only treatments such as rest, fluids and over-the-counter pain and fever-reducing medicine to ease symptoms

Question 7.) What are some Organizations that help support victims and their families of this disease

Answer 7.) Here is one website to help victims of infectious monocleosis www.familydoctor.org