Articles Compare and Contrast

By: Eric Hiralal and Nolan Swearingen

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Article 1 Info

Central Idea: The central idea is that people are against CCSS (Common Core State Standards), while other people support it.


Main Idea 1 - "Less than half of Americans (49 percent) and only 40 percent of teachers now say they support Common Core State Standards (CCSS). "


Main Idea 2 - "'As you may know, in the last few years states have been deciding whether or not to use the Common Core, which are standards for reading and math that are the same across the states. In the states that have these standards, they will be used to hold public schools accountable for their performance. Do you support or oppose the use of the Common Core standards in your school?'"


Main Idea 3 - "Support for Common Core is down among both Republicans and Democrats. In 2013, 57 percent of Republicans and 64 percent of Democrats said they supported CCSS. But by 2015, that percentage had dropped 20 points for Republicans (to 37 percent) and seven points for Democrats (to 57 percent)."

Article 2 Info

Central Idea - The central idea is that Common Core is becoming popular again. Teachers are starting to get fond of it and think it's a good idea.


Main Idea 1 - "...three out of four teachers have 'embraced the new standards' either 'quite a bit' or 'fully.'”


Main Idea 2 - "Four in five math teachers say they have increased 'emphasis on conceptual understanding' and 'application of skills,' while an even higher proportion of English teachers reported assigning more writing 'with use of evidence.'”

How do the authors utilize statistics to demonstrate teacher and general approval of Common Core?

The authors utilize statistics to demonstrate teacher and general approval of Common Core because it shows that teachers approve of Common Core and how it's not a scandal.

What is unique about author one’s approach vs. author two’s approach?

In author one's approach, she talks about how Common Core is becoming less popular. In author two's approach, she talks about how Common Core is becoming popular again.

What data does the first author include to support her claim? What data does the second author include to support her claim?

Some data the first author includes to support her claim are statistics and quotes. Some data the second author includes to support her claim are years/dates and statistics.

How do the tones differ?

The tone of the first article is very serious. The tone in the second article is very calm. These tones differ because serious is the opposite of calm.

Citations

  • The Huffington Post. N.p., 2016. Web. 5 Apr. 2016.


  • "Poll: Only 40% Of Teachers Support Common Core". CNS News. N.p., 2015. Web. 5 Apr. 2016.