Government

Palyce Jeveron The English Petition of Rights 2B Tucei

English Petition of Rights

This document was written in England by the Parliament & was passed in June 1628.

It was intended to bring justice, peace, and fairness to England because King Charles I abused his authority. It wasn't successful the first try, which lead to a harder fight for rightfulness, however it was soon ratified and sent to the king for acceptance.

There were 4 main points !

  • No taxes could be levied without Parliament's consent.
  • No English subject could be imprisoned without cause--thus reinforcing the right of habeas corpus.
  • No martial law may be used in peacetime.
  • No quartering of soldiers in citizens homes.

Its Impact on the Development of the U.S Government

The petition was used as a guide to form present day government. Today, the government still can NOT legally put a man/woman in prison without fair trial, HOWEVER, President Obama recently has proposed "Prolonged Detention". Which is the idea of imprisoning an individual without fair trials with the consideration of security and protection of the public.
Obama Legalises Permanent Imprisonment without Charge or Trial
The fourth point in the English Petition of Rights 1628 was passed down to our Constitution today. In amendment III it is stated, "No Soldier shall, in anytime of peace be quartered in any house, without the consent of the Owner, nor in time of war, but in a manner to be prescribed by law."

Today soldiers live in either barracks, which are assigned, or make shift quarters in which they share, depending on the place and/or mission.

Citations

Bradley, Freda. "Petition of Right of 1628: Definition & Summary."

www.study.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 September 2015


Obama Legalises Permanent Imprisonment without Charge or Trial. Perf.

President Obama. MSNBC, 2014. Newscast


"The Petition of Rights 1628." www.pearltrees.com. Web. 23 September 2015


"The Petition of Rights." N.p., n.d. Web. 28 September 2015. <http://www.east- buc.k12.la.us/01_02/AH/pr/pr.html.>.


Wood, Gordon S. "Amendment III Quartering of Soldiers." National

Constitution Center. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 September 2015.