Andrew Jackson

The Great Political Hero

Why was he a hero

The Battle of New Orleans

On December 24, 1814, Great Britain and the United States signed a treaty in Ghent, Belgium that effectively ended the War of 1812. News was slow to cross the pond, however, and on January 8, 1815, the two sides met in what is remembered as one of the conflict’s biggest and most decisive engagements. In the bloody Battle of New Orleans, future President Andrew Jackson and a motley assortment of militia fighters, frontiersmen, slaves, Indians and even pirates weathered a frontal assault by a superior British force, inflicting devastating casualties along the way. The victory vaulted Jackson to national stardom, and helped foil plans for a British invasion of the American frontier. After British forces were sighted near Lake Borgne, Jackson declared martial law in New Orleans and ordered that every available weapon and able-bodied man be brought to bear in the city’s defense. His force soon grew into a 4,500-strong patchwork of army regulars, frontier militiamen, free blacks, New Orleans aristocrats and Choctaw tribesmen. The two sides first came to blows on December 23, when Jackson launched a daring nighttime attack on British forces bivouacked nine miles south of New Orleans.Addressing his troops shortly after the battle, he hailed their “undaunted courage” in saving the country from invasion and said, “Natives of different states, acting together, for the first time in this camp…have reaped the fruits of an honorable union.”
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Bank of the United States shuts down

On this day in 1833, President Andrew Jackson announces that the government will no longer use the Second Bank of the United States, the country's national bank. He then used his executive power to remove all federal funds from the bank, in the final salvo of what is referred to as the "Bank War."The Bank War refers to the political struggle that developed over the issue of rechartering the bank during the Andrew Jackson administration (1829–1837). So that is how the bank closed.
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Jacksonian Democracy

Jacksonian democracy is the political movement during the Second Party System toward greater democracy for the common man symbolized by American politician Andrew Jackson and his supporters. An ambiguous, controversial concept, Jacksonian Democracy in the strictest sense refers simply to the ascendancy of Andrew Jackson and the Democratic party after 1828. More loosely, it alludes to the entire range of democratic reforms that proceeded alongside the Jacksonian triumph—from expanding the suffrage to restructuring federal institutions. From another angle, however, Jacksonian appears as a political impulse tied to slavery, the subjugation of Native Americans, and the celebration of white supremacy.
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Political Cartoon

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The cartoon is about Jackson being a hero to the common man. In September 10th,1833 president Andrew Jackson came to the bank and shut down the bank within one second he told the bank director that the bank is shut down. On this day in 1833, President Andrew Jackson announces that the government will no longer use the Second Bank of the United States , the country's national bank. He then used his executive power to remove all federal funds from the bank, in the final salvo of what is referred to as the "Bank War."

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