HINDUISM

METHODS OF JOY

FESTIVALS

1.DIWALI

Deepawali or Diwali is certainly the biggest and the brightest of all Hindu festivals. It's the festival of lights. (deep = light and avali = a row i.e., a row of lights) that's marked by four days of celebration, which literally illumines the country with its brilliance, and dazzles all with its joy. Each of the four days in the festival of Diwali is separated by a different tradition, but what remains true and constant is the celebration of life, its enjoyment and goodness. Historically, the origin of Diwali can be traced back to ancient India, when it was probably an important harvest festival. However, there are various legends pointing to the origin of Diwali or 'Deepawali.' Some believe it to be the celebration of the marriage of Lakshmi with Lord Vishnu. Whereas in Bengal the festival is dedicated to the worship of Mother Kali, the dark goddess of strength. Lord Ganesha, the elephant-headed God, the symbol of auspiciousness and wisdom, is also worshiped in most Hindu homes on this day. In jainism, Deepawali has an added significance to the great event of Lord Mahavira attaining the eternal bliss of nirvana. Diwali also commemorates the return of Lord rama along with Sita and Lakshman from his fourteen year long exile and vanquishing the demon-king Ravana. In joyous celebration of the return of their king, the people of Ayodhya, the Capital of Rama, illuminated the kingdom with earthen diyas (oil lamps) and burst crackers.







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HOLI

Holi - the festival of colors - is undoubtedly the most fun-filled and boisterous of Hindu festival. It's an occasion that brings in unadulterated joy and mirth, fun and play, music and dance, and, of course, lots of bright colours

Happy Days Are Here Again!
With winter neatly tucked up in the attic, it's time to come out of our cocoons and enjoy this spring festival Every year it is celebrated on the day after the full moon in early March and glorifies good harvest and fertility of the land. It is also time for spring harvest. The new crop refills the stores in every household and perhaps such abundance accounts for the riotous merriment during Holi. This also explains the other names of this celebration - 'Vasant Mahotsava' and 'Kama Mahotsava'.

"Don't Mind, It's Holi!"
During Holi, practices, which at other times could be offensive, are allowed. Squirting colored water on passers-by, dunking friends in mud pool amidst teasing and laughter, getting intoxicated on bhaang and reveling with companions is perfectly acceptable. In fact, on the days of Holi, you can get away with almost anything by saying, "Don't mind, it's Holi!" (Hindi = Bura na mano, Holi hai.)

The Festive License!
Women, especially, enjoy the freedom of relaxed rules and sometimes join in the merriment rather aggressively. There is also much vulgar behavior connected with phallic themes. It is a time when pollution is not important, a time for license and obscenity in place of the usual societal and caste restrictions. In a way, Holi is a means for the people to ventilate their 'latent heat' and experience strange physical relaxations.


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DANCES

In India , there are many popular dances . each and every state of India has a popular dance . For example - in Tamil Nadu - Bharathanattiyam , in Kerala -Kathakalli , in Orissa-Kuchipidi , etc



FOOD

In Delhi , people are fond of dal makhni and choole pathure.


In Rajasthan, one of the best and yummiest food is found in Rajasthan. During your cultural tours to Rajasthan, North India you get an opportunity to taste the excellent and varied cuisine prepared in Rajasthan, North India. Every region in Rajasthan, North India has something special to offer. Rajasthan or the land of the royalty has had a long tradition of exotic cuisine. Cooking in the royal kitchens in the days of Rajput glory was a huge affair. Several cooks would work together to cook the most delectable, spicy and delicious dishes. Cooking in Rajasthan, North India has always been treated as an important art form and is an important part of Rajasthan's culture.

In Punjab, Punjabi pakawan is food famous in the sides of Punjab region of northwestern India and eastern Pakistan. It can be non-vegetarian or completely vegetarian. One of the main features of Punjabi cuisine is its diverse range of dishes. Home cooked and restaurant Punjabi cuisine can vary significantly, with restaurant style using large amounts of ghee, clarified butter, with liberal amounts of butter and cream with home cooking concentrating on mainly upon preparations with Whole Wheat, rice and other ingredients flavored with masala . Roh Di Kheer, is cooked using rice. Rice is cooked for a long time in sugar cane juice.