Divergent

reviewed by Christine Kang

Will Tris be able to survive this huge change??

by Veronica Roth

487 pages

summary

Divergent's setting is in a distopian setting. There are 5 factions, Erudite (smart), Candor (truthful), Abnegation (selfless), Dauntless (brave), and Amity (kind). The main character, Beatrice (Tris) Prior is born as an Abnegation member. But like every other person, when they are 16, she takes the Apitude Test, which is a test which tells you which faction you are most fit for. In her Apitude Test, her results are inconclusive, which means that she is a Divergent. Divergent means that she was cut out for more than one faction, which makes her dangerous. Tris has to keep this a secret, because if people find out, they will want to kill her. She ends up transfering to Dauntless. But because she was born an Abnegation (Stiff), she was selfless, but not very brave like the Dauntless people. That makes other people make fun of her, and throughout the book, she gets bullied by Peter, Drew, and Molly. Meanwhile, the Erudite faction, which her brother transfered to, and Abnegation, her old faction, are tense. The representative of Erudite, Jeanine, are releasing articles about Abnegation, to make them look bad. One thing Jeanine is using is the fact that Tris's dad, a very important member of Abnegation, has two children, who both left him.

Will Tris be able to get used to life as a brave fighter, and accept that her family was split apart?

MAIN CHARACTERS

  • Tris
  • Four (Tobias)
  • Christina

theme

I think the theme of this book is to choose wisely. In this book, an example would be that if Tris had chosen a safer place, her future might have been safer, too. For example, if Tris stayed in Abnegation, her parents probably wouldn't have died. She wouldn't have gotten that bullied, or hurt, either. Tris could have lived a life more safer, and less dramatic. So even thought Tris learned some new skills, and got new friends, I thought she should have thought things through more carefully. This theme relates to real life, too. It represents that one choice could change everything. If you take one bad step, everything could be ruined.