Noble Gases

By: Timmy, Ben and Philip

About the Noble Gases

Helium- Helium was discovered in 1895.

Pierre Janssen discovered helium in 1868 but was not fully discovered until Sir Williams Ramsay discovered the full form of helium 1895.

Pierre Janssen partially found helium during the solar eclipse of 1868 in India when he discovered a mysterious yellow line in the solar spectrum very close to the yellow sodium D-line. Sir William Ramsay discovered helium after experiments with a mineral called cleveite, a uranium mineral, with mineral acids.

Helium was discovered in London, England and Uppsala, Sweden.

Melting Point: 0.95K

Boiling Point: 4.22K

Valence Electrons: 2


Neon- Neon was discovered in 1898.

Neon was found by Sir William Ramsay and Morris W. Travers.

Neon was discovered through experiments with water vapor

Neon was discovered in London, England.

Melting Point: 24.56K

Boiling Point: 27.07K

Valence Electrons: 8

Safety Concerns: If neon is obtained in a cannister it is realistic that it could explode and therefore is very flammable. Neon gas also serves as an inhalation hazard. Neon is not toxic but can fill up a room and can quickly kill people by plugging up their airways.


Argon- Argon was discovered in 1894

Argon was discovered by Sir William Ramsay and Lord Rayleigh.

Argon was separated from some things by examination of the left overs gained by removing nitrogen, oxygen, carbon dioxide, and water from fresh and filtered air.

Argon was discovered in Scotland.

Melting Point: 83.8K

Boiling Point: 87.3K

Valence Electrons: 8



Krypton: Krypton was discovered in 1998

Krypton was found by Sir William Ramsay, Morris W. Travers.

Krypton was discovered when his student Morris Travers in the stuff left after liquid air had nearly boiled away. Krypton was left in the stuff after boiling away water, oxygen, nitrogen, helium, and argon from the bit of air.

Krypton was discovered in Great Britain.

Melting Point: 115.79K

Boiling Point:119.93K

Valence Electrons: 8


Xenon- Xenon was discovered in 1898

Xenon was found by Sir William Ramsay, Morris W. Travers.

Xenon was discovered in the residue left after evaporating liquid air needs. They had to work with gigantic volumes of air to make just a tiny bit of xenon.

Xenon was discovered in England.

Melting Point: 161.4K

Boiling Point: 165.1K

Valence Electrons: 8



Radon- Radon was discovered in 1900

Radon was found by Friedrich Ernst Dorn.

Radon was found when Dorn was studying radium’s decay chain.

Radium was discovered in Germany.

Melting Point: 202K

Boiling Point: 211.3K

Valence Electrons: 8

Safety concerns: Radon is a cancer-causing gas. You cannot smell, see or taste radon, but it may be a cause of many things in your home. The Surgeon General has said that radon is the a huge cause of lung cancer in the United States today. Radon can build up in your house because it can spill through cracks in basement walls and many floors because it comes from rocks and soil.

3 Uses Noble Gases Provide

Some of the family members that we use for making products in the noble gas family are helium, neon, and argon. We use helium a lot today for one main product, the balloon. Helium in a balloon helps to keep the balloon floating and stable. Neon is what we use to illuminate or light open signs or signs that can pretty much be used for expressing any business or restaurant. Argon is mostly used when an unstable place is needed. It is used to fill incandescent and fluorescent light bulbs to keep oxygen from ruining the filament. Argon is also used to form unstable atmospheres many other complicated things.

Citation Page and Places of Birth and Discovery

http://tectonics.asu.edu/page1/files/page1_1.gif

"The Element Argon." It's Elemental -. N.p., n.d. Web. 27 Jan. 2014.

"Helium." WebElements Periodic Table of the Elements. N.p., n.d. Web. 27 Jan. 2014.

"How Many Valence Electrons Do Helium and Hydrogen Have?" Yahoo! Answers. Yahoo!, n.d. Web. 28 Jan. 2014.

"Argon." WebElements Periodic Table of the Elements. N.p., n.d. Web. 27 Jan. 2014.

"How Many Valence Electrons Does Argon Have?" - Ask.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 Jan. 2014.

Braeuner, Shellie. "Precautions for Neon | EHow." EHow. Demand Media, 05 June 2011. Web. 28 Jan. 2014.

"Argon." WebElements Periodic Table of the Elements. N.p., n.d. Web. 27 Jan. 2014.

"How Many Valence Electrons Does Argon Have?" - Ask.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 Jan. 2014.

"Krypton." WebElements Periodic Table of the Elements. N.p., n.d. Web. 27 Jan. 2014.

"How Many Valence Electrons Does Argon Have?" - Ask.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 Jan. 2014.

"Xenon." WebElements Periodic Table of the Elements. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 Jan. 2014.

"How Many Valence Electrons Does Argon Have?" - Ask.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 Jan. 2014.

"Radon." WebElements Periodic Table of the Elements. N.p., n.d. Web. 25 Jan. 2014.

"The Element Radon." It's Elemental -. N.p., n.d. Web. 25 Jan. 2014.

"How Many Valence Electrons Does Argon Have?" - Ask.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 Jan. 2014.

"Radon.com." Radon Facts. N.p., n.d. Web. 27 Jan. 2014.

"Details about Complete Set of Noble Gases Sealed in Ampoules." EBay. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 Jan. 2014.

"Hi-Res Images OfChemical Elements." Hi-Res Image of Radon. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 Jan. 2014.

"Noble Gases | Earth & Solar System." Earth Solar System. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 Jan. 2014.


This is where Helium was discovered

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=London,+England+google+maps&ie=UTF-8&hq=&hnear=0x47d8a00baf21de75:0x52963a5addd52a99,London,+UK&gl=us&ei=K27XUqydHKTKsQSgxoHQDQ&ved=0CCoQ8gEwAA&safe=active

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=London,+England+google+maps&ie=UTF-8&hq=&hnear=0x47d8a00baf21de75:0x52963a5addd52a99,London,+UK&gl=us&ei=K27XUqydHKTKsQSgxoHQDQ&ved=0CCoQ8gEwAA&safe=active

This is where Sir William Ramsay, the discoverer of every element in the noble gases except for radon.

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=glasgow+scotland&ie=UTF-8&hq=&hnear=0x488815562056ceeb:0x71e683b805ef511e,Glasgow,+Glasgow+City,+UK&gl=us&eThis is where Morris W. Travers, Ramsay’s student, who helped discover Neon, Krypton, and Xenon was born

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=london&ie=UTF-8&hq=&hnear=0x47d8a00baf21de75:0x52963a5addd52a99,London,+UK&gl=us&ei=tHHXUr7rHMzJsQS9j4LoBA&ved=0CI0BELYD&safe=active

This is where Lord Rayleigh was born, partial discoverer of Argon

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=maldon&ie=UTF-8&hq=&hnear=0x47d8de18ab1598d5:0x9a2e9db7f07dcd2a,Maldon,+Essex,+UK&gl=us&ei=M3LXUta9AYXKsQSyzYCQCg&ved=0CHcQtgM&safe=active

This is where Friedrich Ernst Dorn, the discoverer of Radon, was born

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=polska+dobre+miasto&ie=UTF-8&hq=&hnear=0x46e2893e31127ddf:0xed39857ddf27278e,Dobre+Miasto,+Poland&gl=us&ei=-XLXUobHEIfgsASd-4HYCA&ved=0CHEQtgM&safe=active

This is where neon was discovered

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=london+england+google+maps&ie=UTF-8&hq=&hnear=0x47d8a00baf21de75:0x52963a5addd52a99,London,+UK&gl=us&ei=a3TXUqvqOazMsQSIr4HQCg&sqi=2&pjf=1&ved=0CCgQ8gEwAA&safe=active

This is where argon was discovered

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=scotland+google+maps&ie=UTF-8&hq=&hnear=0x4861e2c403f2a19f:0xe7c1fad809c30714,Scotland,+UK&gl=us&ei=1HXXUrTREumjsQTI2ICABQ&sqi=2&pjf=1&ved=0CCgQ8gEwAA&safe=active

This is where Krypton was discovered

https://maps.google.co.uk/

This is where Xenon was discovered

https://maps.google.co.uk/

This is where Radon was discovered

https://maps.google.co.uk/