#MV Teach

February 2016

Reading Strategies

Duet Reading

Objective: To increase fluent reading particularly for students • who often lose their spot while reading • who just don’t get to the next word quickly enough. • who benefit from a delayed model for correct word reading Materials: Short texts that the student can read with at least 95% accuracy.

Sequence:

1. First Reading – student reads the passage aloud. Teacher provides immediate standard error corrections. (“That word is _______. What word?” The student repeats the word. Teacher says, “Yes. That word is _______.” Student goes back to the beginning of the sentence to begin again.)

2. Second Reading – Teacher and student take turns reading EVERY OTHER WORD. Teacher first this time. Teacher should read with excellent expression to avoid typewriter style output. Teacher should push the pace forward by reading each next word as soon as the student read the last word. Teacher provides standard error corrections immediately following any error. (“That word is _______. What word?” The student repeats the word. Teacher says, “Yes. That word is _______.” Student goes back to the beginning of the sentence to begin again.)

3. Third Reading – Teacher and student take turns reading EVERY OTHER WORD. Student first this time. Teacher continues to model excellent expression and to press the pace forward. Teacher provides standard error corrections immediately following any error. (“That word is _______. What word?” The student repeats the word. Teacher says, “Yes. That word is _______.” Student goes back to the beginning of the sentence to begin again.)

4. Fourth Reading – Student reads the entire passage out loud alone.


www.swsc.org/cms/lib04/.../Centricity/.../Duet_Reading_Intervention.pdf

Retell and Jump Back In

There may be times a reader's mind wanders. When this happens, it's important to bring your attention back to the text. Use the following prompts when instructing students on this strategy.

  • Retell
  • Say back what you remember
  • What part seems fuzzy? Can you go back and reread to retell?
  • When did you find your mind wandering?
  • Did your mind wander there? You know what to do. Show me.
  • Let me watch you jump back into the book.
  • You're retelling before you jump back into the book-that's really going to help you stay focused.

Taken from The Reading Strategies Book by Jennifer Serravallo

Teaching Channel Video

Spotlight on Productive Group Work

Say Something Protocol

  1. Pair up for partner discussion.
  2. Read silently to the designated “stopping point”.
  3. When each partner has finished reading up to the “stopping point”, stop and “Say Something”** to one another.
  4. Continue the process until you have completed the process of stopping to “Say Something” to one another at each stopping point throughout the entire reading selection.
  5. As partners, find one main point in the reading that you want to highlight to the group. Be prepared to share the information and formulate conversation around the topic.
  6. When everyone is done reading, each team will share their special learning with the group. Group discussion around these points should occur.
  7. Continue the process of team sharing and discussion until each group has had a time to share.



What does the protocol do?

Supports individual learning by promoting short dialogue points throughout the reading, as well as at the end through whole group dialogue. This protocol offers these short periods of dialogue with partners in non-threatening manner.

Structure minimizes off-task comments and non-essential elaboration

Requires attentive listening and respect for the ideas of others

Slows the pace of the response, providing individuals with time for reflection as well as a protected space within which to offer comments

** “Say Something” might be a question, a brief summary statement, a key point, an interesting idea or personal connection.


https://www.kpbsd.k12.ak.us/WorkArea/DownloadAsset.aspx?id=20183

Technology Integration

AEA Online Resources

Don't forget Heartland AEA has free online resources your students can use to access text, research, and create!
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