Anglo European School

Bulletin

AES COVID UPDATE No 28


The Anglo Family is slowly coming back together again with many of our study support sessions being fully booked and our provision for key worker children and vulnerable children increasing in popularity. For instance, yesterday we had 86 students in Year 10 attend for the Science support sessions. It is really important if you have booked that you let us know if you cannot attend so that we can allocate the place to someone else.


Our minds now turn to planning the summer holiday period, site works, transition plans for September opening. School will not be open for any children from 23rd July until 2nd September, when Year 7 and the Lower Sixth will return. The remainder of the school will return on 3rd September, allowing that first day for new students to the main school and Sixth form to have the induction day they have been deprived of this term. The 1st of September will be a Staff Training Day. Our families are therefore free to organise the summer holiday period as they choose. We are currently considering how we can organise our traditional August transition week for Year 6 students coming into our Year 7, given the current guidelines in terms of social distancing. Our new Year 7 team recently perfected a new set of skills and have produced a wonderful welcome video for our new September starters. The feedback has been very encouraging.


As for September we are very much looking into a crystal ball, with firmer guidance due later this week. At the moment, we anticipate all students being required to attend school from 3rd September but the government will issue clearer advice on this on Thursday and we will provide our first reflections on this in next week's update. We will also need guidance from the train and bus operators concerning how they can best support us to meet any new regulations in getting students to school safely.


We have made some progress in terms of installing large canopies and food outlets to give us more options at break and lunchtimes, to reduce the need for large numbers of students to gather in one place.


We continue to be encouraged by the large number of positive comments we are receiving and also recognise where we can improve what we are doing. For instance, we hope you like the new design for our newsletter which makes it much more accessible on a mobile phone. The software we are now using, SMORE, will also make it possible to improve other school publications in due course.


These continue to be very challenging times for the school and its staff and your continued support and encouragement counts for more than you might imagine. Thank you.


David Barrs and Jody Gee

Headteachers

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Key Messages:

Examination Results (Year 11 and Upper Sixth)

Black Lives Matter

Reminders:

Ensure the Well-being Survey on Showmyhomework on Thursday is completed by 3.30pm Friday.

Features:

Well-being at Home:

UCL Well-being and Behaviour Survey

Foodbank Support

Travel Survey


Studying at Home:

Showbie

Sports Day 2020

Mr Beedell's Conundrum

International Recipe to try at home

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Examination Results - Years 11 and Upper Sixth


For A level results (13th August) and GCSE results (20th August) – the school will send your results to you via your school email account. You will not be able to collect your results in person at school; however, there will be the facility to come into school for advice as well as the opportunity to do this on the phone. More information will follow on this and there will be a separate InTouch message to students and parents in due course. In the meantime, it is vital that you ensure that there is sufficient space in your school email inbox so that you can receive your results; therefore, make sure you delete all unwanted emails from your inbox in good time.

Congratulations to 15 students from Anglo's Sixth Form, who took part in 'The Legal Apprentice', a competition for budding law students, organised by national law firm, Kingsley Napley.


The contest required students to form teams and work through a series of real world scenarios, which tested the teams' legal research skills, drafting and presentation skills. The final round of the national contest required teams to pitch their own legal practice to a prospective client.


All teams worked independently. Despite not being among the tiny handful going forward to the national final, teams received detailed feedback from practising lawyers and gained a real insight into the reality of a career in Law.


A special mention goes to Camilla Sechi, Ellie Thackeray, Prettipa Wong-Anan and Alissa Mainstone, whose 'excellent' final presentation placed them in the top 14% of the entire competition.

Black Lives Matter

Art has long been used to raise questions, challenge perceptions and raise concerns arising in society at the time. We have recently launched the Story-Telling Project to capture a written piece or performance which reflects out students’ experiences. Last week, I was contacted by Eleah Evans-Hadi, a member of our Diversity Forum, about creating an interactive gallery and aesthetic representation of our students’ feelings of fear an outrage. It’s a place to reflect on social injustice and create an expression of respect for those who have lost their lives and allow our students to express their thoughts and feelings creatively. We would really like to support this work and If you would like to be involved in this project or have pieces to offer to include in the exhibition/gallery, get in touch and we can put you in contact with Eleah and the students who are leading this project.


This week, we were also contacted by a Year 7 Parent bought our attention an interactive gallery created by young people from the Bollo Brook Youth Centre, located in South Acton, West London.


At the heart of the art project is a collection of recordings of interviews with young people; these are unstructured discussions where young people talk openly with their art tutor about race. They have also created a new virtual exhibition working with young artists which aims to support and encourage meaningful conversations around racism. One contributor wrote:-


“The interviews tell of young black men feeling they have the responsibility to prove themselves as ‘safe’ when entering white-dominated space, of young Somali women feeling fetishised by the Western gaze, of mixed race young people feeling excluded by both white and black people alike, and of white young people feeling shut out from conversations about race whilst also suffering racial abuse themselves. These tales of modern day racism will not find easy answers in good intentions or policy changes alone. It is only by asking ourselves difficult questions about our own conditioning and the role of race in ours and others’ experiences, like we have in the project, that we can really start to understand the role of race and racism in our society.”


The website can be found at https://www.imnotyour.co.uk/race-youth-young-people/

Some of the images and words here are very powerful, challenging and provocative and the language used may be offensive to some, so we would certainly advise parental guidance for our younger students to view this material.


However, we felt it was inspiring and may inspire further creative thinking from our students about how they would like our school to respond to the Black Lives Matter movement in the months ahead.

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Wellbeing and Behaviour: Identifying interventions for positive participation for young people at risk of exclusion in school

We are delighted to announce that we are one of two secondary schools to be awarded funding to participate in a research project with the University College, London, IOE.


Why are we doing this research?

In the aftermath of the Covid-19 pandemic, inequalities will undoubtedly rise. We already know that rates of exclusion from education in all schools are rising, particularly when ‘excluded’ covers permanent and fixed-term exclusions, internal exclusions, de-registration on request, and self-exclusion (persistent absenteeism).

We want a better understand of how adapting wellbeing and behaviour policies and practices can help address a key risk for children who are already at risk of exclusion, even at the point of transition from primary to secondary education.

The project adopts a holistic and well-being focused approach; we know that sound relationships support inclusion. UCL have therefore designed a multi-method study that includes analysis of large scale data sets; interviews; and a knowledge exchange programme which AES is delighted to participate in.


How will the research be conducted?

During the study, a core team of staff will be interviewed, and we will run a programme called Supporting Wellbeing, Emotional Resilience and Learning (SWERL) which is a social pedagogic approach to reducing exclusions. The project brings together UCL researchers and facilitators, social pedagogy trainers, Treehouse Associates and a core team of AES staff to develop new evidence via case studies of in-school activities. SWERL was designed to support schools in looking at whole school approaches to supporting wellbeing and emotional resilience. It has a particular focus on KS2-KS3 transition and the new demands of post-pandemic challenges. Never has this work been more important.

We are really excited to be part of this research and hope to learn how to support our most vulnerable students more effectively through the SWERL approach, particularly in the light of the pandemic, which will have accentuated vulnerabilities more acutely.


Mrs Gee, Headteacher

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Travel to school survey for parents

Sustrans have developed a survey for parents and guardians, looking at how children and their families travel to and from school (pre Covid-19). The survey is only 10 questions long and should take approximately 4 minutes to fill out. This survey is really important to determine how school runs can be made safer, easier and more sustainable.


A link to the survey can be found below, and the survey closes on Sunday 12 July:

https://sustrans.onlinesurveys.ac.uk/essex-schools-parent-survey


Everyone that completes the survey will be entered into a prize draw to win a bike worth up to £400 including accessories (helmet and lock)!


At the end of the survey the data will be supplied to each school which can help assist with travel plans and discussions moving forward.

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Showbie

We have recently signed up to Showbie in order to enhance online learning opportunities for students. In order to get students set up and ready to use Showbie they have been set a task by Mrs Wootton on Show My Homework. Mrs Wootton's instructions explain how they should log in to Showbie for the first time. Please encourage your child to look at this task and follow the instructions carefully.

When teachers set up a class on Showbie it generates a class code. Teachers will then share this code with students who will need to follow the link from their teachers to join their classes. (In general, students are used to following this process as they are already using websites with similar set up procedures).


Please be aware that Showbie may not be used by every teacher for every class.

We hope that the introduction of Showbie will allow students to hear their teachers' voices more frequently and allow students to access a wider range of interactive resources.

The Trees Are Talking, Poem by Year 9 student, Fynn Schluter

The tree is talking

this great oak of Sherwood

is talking.

It tells me the story of the forest

It tells me of the beginning

When this forest covered a continent

A continent no man has ever seen

Or stepped foot on

A vast continent

Spreading the breadth of this planet.

The tree tells me

It tells me of large dangerous creatures

Stalking their pray

Their might nothing compared to the trees

Or that of the meteor

wiping them out

yet if the forest survives

life survives

and as the plants start to grow

rebuilding the forest tree by tree

creatures rise out of the sea and dirt

keeping the forest company.

The forest tells me of the separation of its brethren

as the land moves apart from itself

it tells me of how the creatures start to change

growing stronger, faster

smarter

yet out of all these creatures

only one rises above the rest

Sports Day 2020

We hope you have all been training for our virtual Sports Day, the details are below:

You will be representing your form group and every single entry scores points for your form. There will also be bonus points for the fastest times. WE WILL NOT BE PUBLISHING ANY INDIVIDUAL TIMES.

How does it work?

There are 12 events across 3 disciplines: Walk, Run and Cycle

· Walk: 2km, 3km, 5km, 8km

· Run: 1km, 2km, 3km, 5km

· Cycle: 3km, 5km, 8km, 10km

You can enter a maximum of 1 event from each discipline e.g 1x walk, 1x run, 1x cycle

You will need a way of measuring the distance you travelled, most smartphones have the capacity to do this for you or you can download an app such as Strava tracker. Ask your parent if there are any issues with this.

We will mainly be relying on trust that you complete the events in the time you post, however please take a screen shot of your results as we may ask for verification

When does this start?

NOW. You can start to record your times and distances you complete already and keep them safe. In the week commencing Monday 6th July, we will send out a document for you to enter your results. You can only complete this document once, and the cut-off date will be Friday 10th July at 3.30pm.

We will announce which form has won the following week.

Good luck!

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Mr Beedell's Conundrum

Find the mistake in this sequence: 1, 4, 6, 8, 9, 11, 12, 14


Solution to last week's conundrum:

Work out the trick to find the missing value. 9 comes from 24, 16, 21 and 22. 32 comes from 16, 12, 10 and 38. What would come from 31, 23, 25 and 35?

Answer: 18; add together the first and fourth numbers, then subtract the second and third numbers from this

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Acting Masterclass in Spanish with Jorge Eines

The Cervantes Theatre with the collaboration of the Cervantes Institute have organised this free online Masterclass in Spanish with the renowned acting teacher and actor's coach Jorge Eines.

This Masterclass “El origen de la técnica o el destino del teatro” will take place on the 6th July at 6pm and it will be introduced by Jorge de Juan, artistic director of the Cervantes Theatre and the Spanish Theatre Company and former student of Jorge Eines.

Free webinar. Register here.

Term Dates

TERM DATES 2020

Summer Term

Monday 20th April 2020 -

Wednesday 22nd July 2020

Autumn Term

Tuesday 1st September 2020 (non-pupil day)

Friday 18th December 2020

Half term Monday 26th—Friday 30th October 2020