Homelessness and health

Are homeless people getting the correct health treatment?

Health Insurance

. "Homeless people are three to six times more likely to become ill than housed people (National Health Care for the Homeless Council, 2008). Homelessness precludes good nutrition, good personal hygiene, and basic first aid, adding to the complex health needs of homeless people. Additionally, conditions which require regular, uninterrupted treatment, such as tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS, are extremely difficult to treat or control among those without adequate housing." This quote, coming from the National Coalition for the Homeless states that homeless people are more likely to develop tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS, along with many other diseases, while on the streets.

Money

Enough, or too much?

There is a lot of controversy about making health care free because of money issues. "We can actually make it so that they are more economical for people who can't get free resources but still have to use, you know, their own money." We can lower the price just enough to have homless people open to it.
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Works Cited

[Announcer] This Podcast Is Presented By The Centers For Disease Control And Prevention. Cdc – Safer, Healthier, and Peopl. Public Health and Homelessness (n.d.): n. pag. Web. 6 Apr. 2015.

Blake, Kelly E. "Study Shows Homeless People with Mental Health Conditions Benefit from Personalized Primary Care." Study Shows Homeless People with Mental Health Conditions Benefit from Personalized Primary Care. University of Maryland, 23 Mar. 2015. Web. 14 Apr. 2015.

"Health Care and Homelessness." National Coalition for the Homeless. National Coalition for the Homeless, 21 Feb. 2012. Web. 10 Apr. 2015.

"Preventing and Controlling Emerging and Reemerging Transmissible Diseases in the Homeless - Volume 14, Number 9-September 2008 - Emerging Infectious Disease Journal - CDC." Preventing and Controlling Emerging and Reemerging Transmissible Diseases in the Homeless - Volume 14, Number 9-September 2008 - Emerging Infectious Disease Journal - CDC. CDC, 2 Oct. 2012. Web. 06 Apr. 2015.


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