Digital Drafts

D. Pipolo EDPC605 2015

Math- AIM: I can use arrays to represent multiplication.

Aim: I can use arrays to represent multiplication


[CCLS. 3.OA.3 : Use multiplication and division within 100 to solve word problems in situations involving equal groups, arrays and measurement quantities (eg- by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem). ]


Essential Questions: How does using an array help us solve a math problem?

How can we relate arrays to another multiplication strategy?


Resources: Go Math: 3.5 + Engage 2

Attached Smart Board Slides (Gallery)


Mini Lesson: (Slide 1) Let's Investigate Arrays!

Guided Practice: (Slide 3) Guided Practice

Check for Understanding: (Exit Slip Packet)

Problem 1: Students are provided with an array and scaffolded questions to help determine the factors and product for a multiplication equation.

Problem2: Students are only provided with an array and are to determine the multiplication equation from it.


Group Work:

Smart Board Station (technology): Slide 5

Laptop Learning (technology): Space Arrays

Blue: Use pictures of arrays to create multiplication equations

Green: Roll two dice. Each dice represents a factor for the equation. Draw an array and write an equation for the array. Repeat.

Guided: Reteach & Intervention group


Share: Students will share their ideas, math words for the day and their groups activities (Slide 6)


Independent: Exit Slip: Judy collects seashells. She arranges them in 3 rows of 6. Draw Judy's array to show how many seashells she has all together. Then write a multiplication sentence to describe the array.

IXL math

CCLS Online math games for students from Pre-K through HS. Our class mostly selects games from grade 3. When differentiating select from grade ranges to best meet the needs of your learners.

Math Playground

This link brings you directly to student friendly math games that are aligned to the CCLS for grade 3. Feel free to browse for other grades :)

Math Support Synopsis

In our integrated collaborative teaching classroom we try our best to reach all of our student's learning needs, styles and preferences in order for them to be successful. Our classroom is lucky and beyond appreciative to have not only laptops and a Smart Board, but TWO Smart Boards to accommodate for parallel teaching and station teaching models. That being said, it is essential that we use technology as much as we can throughout the day.


Smart Board: Allowing students to use the smart board enhances their understanding with visuals and movement. Children have access to various pen tools such as highlighting. They are also able to easily display their mathematical thinking with infinite "math manipulatives". Children in our school have seen the smart boards used before and this year all of our students have opportunity to utilize the tools of the Smart Board several times a day.


Math Resources:

As I build the Smart Board Lessons for the math curriculum team, I search and include games that best serve the importance and of each lesson's skill. Sometimes the functions of the game need to be quickly modeled for the students. Typically if the resource is not student friendly and doesn't pertain to the skill or strategy, it is not selected for use.


Math Playground: Student friendly math games are available at most CCLS skills. The beauty behind this website is that students have been "Playing" on this tool throughout their careers in our school and they have so much fun they forget they are learning.


IXL: Math tasks are set up in a multiple choice / test prep format. I like to have students work on IXL in small partnerships, showing their work on either paper or white boards for each question to I can see their reasoning and process. This site sometimes needs some quick modeling for students but otherwise, displays the content in very concrete (and non distracting) formats.

Reading: Aim: I Can teach others what I have learned, while I read.

Aim: I can teach others what I have learned, while I read (main idea/details)


Essential Question: How can we teach others about information we've read/learned about?


CCLS:

RI.3.1, Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.


SL.3.1, Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 3 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.

a, Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about the topic to explore ideas under discussion.

b, Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., gaining the floor in respectful ways, listening to others with care, speaking one at a time about the topics and texts under discussion).


SL.3.2, Determine the main ideas and supporting details of a text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.


Resources: Teacher's College : Reading to Learn

Mentor Text: Frogs & Toads


Teaching Point: In this session, you'll teach students that readers teach others what they've learned from their nonfiction texts, paying close attention to the main ideas and supporting details. (TC- p.37) Bend I: Figuring out the Main Ideas in Expository Text


Mini Lesson: Today, I want to teach you that when readers read nonfiction texts, they can become experts, and they can teach others what they know. To reach someone, readers need to know the main ideas and the supporting details. It also helps to use an explaining voice and gestures and to use a teaching finger to point out important text features.


Tell children that you are going to read in such a way that you'll become an expert. Then read the passage aloud (to yourself). Section: "What is a Frog". Ask children to observe you as you teach and to notice teaching techniques that they too will use when they teach.


Turn & Talk: Researchers, turn and tell each other, what teaching methods did you observe? Turn and talk.


Active Engagement: Ask children to try using another passage (projected on smart board).

Now it's your turn! This is another passage from our Frogs and Toads book. It's called "Yummy Frog Food". As i read it out loud, think about how you might teach the information to your partner.


Teach your partner all about the important information in this passage. Be sure to remember all you learned about good teaching. Take a moment, think, then teach!


Coach in: Remember to organize your teaching to convey the main ideas and supporting details. I tapped my palm (main idea) and fingers (supporting details) to illustrate those concepts.


Independent Reading Groups/ Guided Groups:

As you read today, remember that you aren't just reading for yourself. You're also reading for your partner. When you read, knowing you have to teach the information you become a "mind on fire reader". All groups will read independently. At the end they will teach their partner within their reading groups about their nonfiction books.


Rug Group: Reading A-Z Projected Book- L- (Smart Board) Buddy reading

Dark Blue: Students using laptops to independently read digital books (www.myon.com)

Yellow Table (Guided Group) All About Chocolate-M-

Pink: Independent Reading from book baggies

Light Blue: (Guided Group) In The Park -G

Green: Students are using laptops for phonics based instruction (www.i-ready.com)

Reading Support Synopsis

In our integrated collaborative teaching classroom we try our best to reach all of our student's learning needs, styles and preferences in order for them to be successful. Our classroom is lucky and beyond appreciative to have not only laptops and a Smart Board, but TWO Smart Boards to accommodate for parallel teaching and station teaching models. That being said, it is essential that we use technology as much as we can throughout the day.



Smart Board: Allowing students to use the smart board enhances their understanding with visuals and movement. Children have access to various pen tools such as highlighting. Children in our school have seen the smart boards used before and this year all of our students have opportunity to utilize the tools of the Smart Board several times a day.


Brain Pop (www.brainpopjr.com): Students have used this media tool as a supplemental learning resource throughout their school wide career. Our school has a subscription and all teachers K-5 use Brain Pop Jr. and Brain Pop for various topics.


Reading Resources:

These Reading resources have been purchased for the school and are expected to be used regularly to develop and maintain student literacy development. Although i-ready program is individualized, teachers have freedom to assign and select texts from MyOn and Reading A-Z. Students have the most freedom with digital literature through MyOn.


MyOn: MyOn is a reading program that improves and enhances stamina and fluency. When students initially log in they are greeted with a reading inventory survey and benchmark assessment to find leveled texts that best suit their reading and interest. Once this is completed students have access to a large frequently updated variety of authentic books. Their home screen breaks the organization of books down by recommendations, personal interests, books other student in their grade are reading, etc. Each book has audio available (with and without text tracking) to promote reading fluency. Along with audio, when each book is opened it has tools available (seen by teacher and student) for leaving sticky notes, highlighting, citing work, dictionary, and even journaling. As students read along, their account logs their time as well as holds their place for next time. MyOn also encourages use of project based learning. Teachers are able to align texts with reading writing and further extension (all purpose) tasks. This program also opens the digital library resources to use as read alouds and shared readings. Students have access to their libraries at home as well as at school.


i-Ready: I-ready is a program that can be used by students from K-12. It is available in math and reading, however our school implements it with a focus on reading skills. Each student is assigned a username. Upon logging on in the beginning of the year, students take a diagnostic assessment. This assessment pinpoints individual skills and needs. Students rotate using i-ready in the classroom throughout the week. It is common core aligned and tracks their progress of each targeted skill.



Reading A-Z: Reading A-Z offers projectable books that students work on and read together on the laptops and Smart Board. We as the teachers select the texts for them to work with. With a quick "coaching in" students can learn how to flip the pages and use note taking tools.

chuchu

Piano Collection - Full Album (Disney) RELAXING PIANO By Hirohashi Makiko by chuchu

D. Pipolo

Special Education Teacher

3rd grade ICT