The Puritans

Morgan Higgins & Alyssa Jarrett

Religious Beliefs

Most of the puritans figured themselves as members of the Church of England. Faith was central to the Puritan experience, Anglicans perceived Puritans as a threat and persecuted them. The pilgrims still believed that they could purge the sins of the church, although New England separatists at Plymouth were so-called because they had thought Anglicanism was broken and they separated from it entirely. The word "Puritan" was actually a term of ridicule devised by opponents of the late-sixteenth-century movement that arose in England. They were also known as "precisionists"

Puritans Clothing

Usually Puritan women wore a long black dresses that covered them almost from neck to toe. They wore a white apron and their hair was up behind a white head dress. Puritan men wore, black pants, a loose shirt with wide sleeves that were gathered at the cuffs, a vest that had either long sleeves or was sleeveless, a jacket called a doublet. and had short hair and a hat. The Puritans did not always wear black. Only the wealthy wore black because the black dye was very expensive. Most Puritans dressed in brown or indigo because brown vegetable and indigo dyes were cheap. They wore other colors as well.

Actions Towards Non-Puritans

The puritans hated separatists they saw them as heretics and traders. Anyone who practiced witchcraft, committed blasphemy, or worshipped a god other than the one acknowledged by the Puritans was subject to death. The name “Puritans” was a term of contempt assigned to the movement by its enemies.

Works Cited

Shmoop Editorial Team. "Sexuality in New England Puritans & Pilgrims." Shmoop. Shmoop University, Inc., 11 Nov. 2008. Web. 2 Feb. 2016.

Myers, Laura. "A Description of What the Puritans Wore." EHow. Demand Media, n.d. Web. 02 Feb. 2016

Campbell, Donna M. "Puritanism in New England." Literary Movements. Dept. of English, Washington State University. 4 Jul 2013. Web. 2 Feb 2016.

Shmoop Editorial Team. "Politics in New England Puritans & Pilgrims." Shmoop. Shmoop University, Inc., 11 Nov. 2008. Web. 2 Feb. 2016.