Therapeutic Cloning

Is it OK to use living embryos for therapeutic cloning?

Background information on Therapeutic Cloning

Therapeutic cloning is used for curing diseases. It is done by scientists extracting the nucleus from a human embryo. This way it has no DNA. Then the scientist takes the nucleus out of an organs cell, or whatever is required. He puts the nucleus from the organ into the embryo. If all of this is done correctly and it works, the scientist will end up with an organ for transplants.

Pros

  • Therapeutic cloning can save someones life
  • It can be used to cure the non-curable diseases. Diseases that are in your organs.
  • The organ would less likely be rejected In the persons body because the tissue they were replacing is genetically identical to the new organ
  • Using therapeutic cloning does not harm any person unless something goes wrong with the transplant
  • You do not get any used organs so there is less of a chance of failure

Cons

  • A human embryo is a living thing so when you turn it into the organ, you are killing it.
  • By killing the embryo, you are violating the "Nuremburg Code-that there should be no experimentation on a human subject when death or disabling injury will result."
  • People think that a person should die when their time comes, not to kill someone to get extra lives

People Related to Therapeutic Cloning

Conclusion

I feel that therapeutic cloning should be allowed, under certain conditions. For example, if a person is elderly and would pass away in a couple of years anyway, I believe therapeutic cloning should not be enforced. Although, if it is a child who needs a transplant, therapeutic cloning should be used only if need be. The child's illness should be a deadly disease if therapeutic cloning is absolutely needed. If it is curable, without the need of a transplant, doctors should wait for the sickness to pass.

Bibliography

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"Elizabeth Blackburn Poses by Her Microscope in Her Lab in San Francisco. Shes Best Known as The..."Medicine, Health, and Bioethics: Essential Primary Sources. Ed. K. Lee Lerner and Brenda Wilmoth Lerner. Detroit: Gale, 2006. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 15 Dec. 2015

Ian Murnaghan BSc (hons), MSc - Updated: 3 Dec 2015

"If Science Could 'Clone A Mammoth,' Could It Save An Elephant?" Weekend All Things Considered 9 May 2015. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 8 Dec. 2015.

Saunders, William. "Therapeutic Cloning Is Immoral." The Ethics of Human Cloning. Ed. John Woodward. San Diego: Greenhaven Press, 2005. At Issue. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 10 Dec. 2015.

"Senate Committee Considers Therapeutic Cloning Legislation." UPI Photo Collection. 2008. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 15 Dec. 2015.

"Stem Cell Research Possible with Cloned Cells." UPI Photo Collection. 2008. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 16 Dec. 2015.

"Therapeutic Cloning: Stem Cell Research." Genetics and Genetic Engineering. Barbara Wexler. 2011 Ed. Detroit: Gale, 2011. Information Plus Reference Series. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 10 Dec. 2015