Acids and Bases

Kennedy Polk, Caroline Boynton and Madison Badura

Materials Used

-toothpicks

-items being tested

-pH paper

-pH scale

-camera

-real lemon juice

-easy off oven cleaner

-vinegar

-tilex

-water

-cranberry juice

-lime water

-italian dressing

-clorox toilet bowl cleaner

-tomato juice

-dr. pepper

-Bona Floor Cleaner


Procedure

1. Gather all 12 items that are being tested

2. take your pH papers and tear them into fourths

3. create a data table with one column being the item tested and the other column being the predicted pH level

4. After predicting all the items' pH level, start testing your first item

5. set out all of your pH strips, and make sure to set them an inch apart on a paper towel

6. take one toothpick and dip it into your first item being tested

7. take the toothpick and put it onto the first pH strip

8. once the pH paper has changed into the color it's supposed to be, compare the colors on the pH scale

9. whatever pH level matches up with the color the pH paper is, record in a data table made just like the predictions one, but change prediction to actual pH level

10. repeat steps 6-9 for the rest of your items being tested

11. clean up your work area and wash your hands

12. take a picture with each item (label showing), pH paper, and pH scale

Acidic Solution

An acidic solution is one where the hydrogen ion concentration is greater than the hydroxide ion concentration. The pH of acidic solutions are always less than 7.

Basic Solutions

A basic solution is one where the hydroxide ion concentration is greater than the hydrogen ion concentration. The pH of basic solutions are always more than 7.

Neutral Solution

A neutral solution is one where the hydrogen ion concentration and the hydroxide ion concentration are equal. The pH of basic solutions are always equal to 7.
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