KNOWING YOUR HISTORY

PLACE, PHOTOGRAPHY, AND POETRY

WRITE OUT INSPIRATION ~ #WRITEOUT

INTRODUCTION

When we learn history in school, we often learn about the big events, events that shaped our country, events such as wars or depressions. Often what is left out is the history that happened in your own backyard. Knowing your local history is just as important as knowing the "big stuff." Local histories shape who you are and how you see the world. Local histories connect a community's past, present, and future. This inspiration uses photography and words to connect you to your place.

THE WRITING

STEP ONE ~ PICTURES OF THE PAST

Find pictures of your town from the past. Visit your local:
  • Museum
  • Historical Society
  • University

A great place to find pictures of your community that are in the public domain is through Wikimedia.

Pick out a few favorites.


(Pictured - Mount Zion Baptist Church 1921)

STEP TWO ~ PICTURES FROM TODAY

  • Visit the place in your town where the photograph you chose was taken.
  • Take a current photograph. Try to get the new picture from the exact same angle.


(Pictured - Mount Zion Baptist Church 2021)

STEP THREE ~ COMPARE AND CONTRAST

If you are a technology wizard you can combine these two photos into one. If you are not a technology wizard:


  • Look at the two photos (old and current) side by side
  • What do you see? What do you think? What do you notice? What do you know?
  • How are these two pictures alike? How are they different?
  • Write your thoughts in a writer's notebook, journal, or on a piece of paper
  • Try Juxtapose Lab to overlay your pictures

STEP FOUR ~ WRITE


ANOTHER OPTION ~ COLLAGE

Another option is to use the older photos and the new photos to make a collage.

SHARE YOUR WRITING

Share your stories online using #writeout or email them to me at shelleymartinyoung@gmail.com. Don't forget to share them with your community, friends, and family.


Write Out Website ~ writeout.nwp.org

The photographs used in this project are courtesy of:


  • Ruth Sigler Avery Collection - Tulsa Race Massacre of 1921, Department ofSpecial Collections and Archives, Oklahoma State University-Tulsa.
  • Unsplash.com
  • Wikimedia