Ancient Roman FAQ

By: Mars Harrison

Writing

The Romans did not have paper. But they did have papyrus which is similar to paper but it is longer lasting typically they would use a quill to write but they also used stylus to carve into mud and sometimes drawings

Family

Roman families were dominated by the father as they had complete control over the family. The father even had the power to kill infants however this was rarely done. The Families took care of their children longer than we did a son wasn't to be independent until the father died, arranged marriages were made, and sometimes the children didnt leave home till their twenties. The women in the house were going to be used to take care of the house and the mother taught the daughter how to do common household chores. Slaves were treated with respect and even played with the children and were sometimes set free. The names of the romans were also limited considering a good amount of them were based off of their fathers names.

Men and Boys Clothing

All romans wore a subligaculum and the most common outer garment was a toga. Togas could have different colors and patterns which would describe their wealth and power. However a Toga was only for men a woman wearing a toga was considered a prostitute. A basic roman garment was a tunic which most romans wore. The roman men DID wear jewlery however it was only a ring which was used to authorize documents. There was a time before where they wore bulla which was a neck chain.

Women and Girls Clothing

Children were permitted to wear togas so little girls wore togas just like the men. However once they reached puberty the gave up their toga and dedicated it to Fortuna Virginalis. The standard married women outfit was a stola a dress that was held to the shoulder and fell to her feet. Their heads were cloaked in a palla. However divorced women and disgraced women were to wear a plain white toga as they weren't allowed to wear a stola anymore. This was the outfit for prostitutes. On womens wedding day they were to wear a tunica recta and they put their hair in fillets to signify her chastity.

Citations

· Writing and Language." World Eras. Ed. John T. Kirby. Vol. 3: Roman Republic and Empire, 264 B.C.E.- 476 C.E. Detroit: Gale, 2001. 170-172. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

· “Family." The Greenhaven Encyclopedia of Ancient Rome. Don Nardo. San Diego: Greenhaven Press, 2002. 153-155. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

· "Names, Roman System of." Ancient Greece and Rome: An Encyclopedia for Students. Ed. Carroll Moulton. Vol. 3. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1998. 66-67. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

· "Clothing." Ancient Greece and Rome: An Encyclopedia for Students. Ed. Carroll Moulton. Vol. 1. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1998. 148-153. World History in Context. Web. 8 Oct. 2015.

· McManus, Barbara F. "Roman Clothing, Part I." Roman Clothing, Part I. VROMA, Aug. 2003. Web. 14 Sept. 2015.

· "The Dress of Roman Women." Arts and Humanities Through the Eras. Ed. Edward I. Bleiberg, et al. Vol. 2: Ancient Greece and Rome 1200 B.C.E.-476 C.E. Detroit: Gale, 2005. 106-109. World History in Context. Web. 8 Oct. 2015.