Genetic Testing

By Savannah Pring

Genomic/Genetic Testing

Testing a person's or an embryo's DNA for specific genes or defects that could point to certain diseases in the future.
Genetic testing has been used since the 1960s when doctors started urging parents to get their newborns tested for rare diseases.

Benefits

  • Genetic testing can be very helpful, or very devastating. It can tell you if you have the possibility of having a certain disease; or if you will pass a disease on to a child if you have one.
  • It can give the patient a sense of relief; they know if they have the potential for a disorder and can plan their life accordingly.

Risks

  • The risks of genetic testing are very small, especially if it just requires a blood sample or cheek swab. Risks for a prenatal test are a little higher because it requires a sample of the fluid from around the baby, which could cause a miscarriage.
  • Risks also include the emotional damage of the patient's results, financial damage, or damage between family members.
  • Another thing is that the tests can only provide a limited amount of info. It can't tell if the patient will show signs of the disorder. There's also a lack of treatment for most of the diseases diagnosed.

Bibliography


"Genetic Testing." Dictionary.com. Dictionary.com, n.d. Web. 08 Sept. 2015.

"Genetic Testing Google Search." Genetic+testing - Google Search. Google Images, n.d. Web. 08 Sept. 2015.

"What Are the Benefits of Genetic Testing?" Genetics Home Reference. Genetics Home Reference, 7 Sept. 2015. Web. 08 Sept. 2015.

"What Are the Risks and Limitations of Genetic Testing?" Genetics Home Reference. Genetics Home Reference, 7 Sept. 2015. Web. 08 Sept. 2015.