"The Uncharmed" by Thomas Wade

By: Halie Huffman, Kelsey Daughtridge, Darrin Simpkins

"The Uncharmed" by Thomas Wade

My piercéd life was all ablood with sorrow

For, suddenly, the veil of beauty thrown

By glorifying youth over sweet to-morrow

Fell, and disclosed to me the future's frown;

Within the wrinkles of whose unread brow

There was a lurking something which till then

I dreamed not hung before the lives of men,

Ready to fall upon them as they grow

Into the longer knowledge of brief years:

Blank vacancy; and doubt; and strangled tears

That never reach the eyelids; vanishing

Of all sweet things we love; death-beds; and graves;

And shadowy wrecks, where pale hopes trembling cling,

Heart-faint, and stifled by continual waves!

Description Of Sonnet

In the sonnet "The Uncharmed" the author describes a single love experience. The sonnet starts off with how the author felt through the beginning of his life until a woman comes into his life, with a fatal flaw, and ruins the love that they had created. The author begins to feel sorrow, sadness, and depression once the truth comes out.
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Tone

The tone of the sonnet “The Uncharmed” was miserable mostly because the author Thomas Wade had sad and depressing lines like “piercéd life was all ablood with sorrow” starting the sonnet off, which lead the reader to feel the depressing emotions too. A short time the author was happy, this happiness did not last long, as the author finished the sonnet off with multiple lines of very sorrowful lines like line twelve of the sonnet “Of all sweet things we love; death-beds; and graves;” after his heart was broken.

Figurative Language

1) "Within the wrinkles of whose unread brow" This is an example of a somewhat alliteration.


This sonnet did not contain many examples of figurative language.

Rhyme Scheme

sorrow A

thrown B

to-morrow A

frown; C

brow D

then E

men, E

grow F

years: G

tears G

vanishing H

graves; I

cling, H

waves! I

Theme

The theme of the sonnet "The Uncharmed" by Thomas Wade is that somethings are too good to be true and it reveals that the author has experienced a bad experience and chooses to express his feelings through this sonnet. The author states in the very beginning"...life was all ablood with sorrow" meaning that his life wasn't so good. In the second and third lines of the sonnet he states "For, suddenly, the veil of beauty thrown By glorifying youth over sweet to-morrow" meaning he met a girl that turned his life around. Ending in "Of all sweet things we love; death-beds; and graves; And shadowy wrecks, where pale hopes trembling cling, Heart-faint, and stifled by continual waves!" meaning that what he loved was ruined, leading to the theme statement "somethings are too good to be true". The woman that came into his life when life was going bad was too good to be true.