Asthma

Asthma, pronounced azma, is a lung disease that inflames your lungs. Asthma causes wheezing-a whistling sound that you make while your breathing-, a tightness in chest or pain in chest, shortness of breath, and coughing. Some people also catch a cold or even the flu because of an asthma attack. People of any age can have asthma, but it usually begins during childhood.

When you breathe, there are tubes going in and out of your lungs. Those tubes are called airways. People with asthma have inflamed airways. Since they have inflamed airways, then their airways are swollen and very sensitive.

For someone with asthma, they may feel perfectly fine until an asthma attack suddenly happens. This is what happens during an asthma attack. When air goes through the airways, the muscles in the airways start to tighten. This narrows the airways and makes it harder for air to go through there, so then it’s harder for them to breathe. Also, the swelling of the airways can get worse, so then the airways get even narrower and it’s even harder for them to breathe. Some of the cells that go through the airways at this time might make more mucus. Mucus is a sticky, thick liquid that can narrow the airways even more, which makes even harder to breathe.

Not everyone with asthma reacts the same way to an asthma attack. Sometimes they have the same symptoms, but sometimes they have different ones. Some asthma attacks are okay, and the other ones are severe.

And sadly, asthma has no cure. But people can live a normal life whether they have asthma or not. Even though asthma has no cure, you can still take medicine to try to help. Enough exercise can help if you have asthma. But, sometimes people have an asthma attack even when they do exercise. You just have to be careful!

My sites:

http://www.webmd.com/asthma/guide/asthma-symptoms

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/asthma/DS00021/DSECTION=symptoms

http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/asthma/

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/info/asthma/

For more information:

http://kidshealth.org/kid/asthma_basics/what/asthma.html

http://proairhfa.com/asthma/default.aspx