Circulate!

Outreach, Engagement & Other Splendid Stuff

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And just like that, it's September and Library Card Sign-Up Month, the perfect time to remind people about the most important card in their wallet and of the incredible work you do every day.


As we continue to push forward through the pandemic, we have a chance to rethink how we do things. This article makes a case for having a COVID contract, which challenges the idea that we can normalize this crisis. Instead, it acknowledges the extraordinary time we're living in, and all of the challenges we face, many of which disproportionally affect women. Mary Ellen Ball suggests writing a contract that recognizes the tremendous difficulty of being productive in a pandemic. She writes:


If we fall apart, we cannot make the changes this world needs right now.


Internal COVID Priorities, in order of importance:


  • Above all else, my goal is to make sure we all get to the other side of this alive.
  • Every employee feels supported, heard and feels secure in asking for help.
  • We can honestly communicate when we are overwhelmed, burned out or need things to be taken off our plates.
  • Our best today may not be what our best was last month or last year. We will have great days and some others that are not so great. Our goals and expectations will be different. We need to communicate that with each other openly.
  • We will hold each other with grace, understanding, and support.
  • We will stay open for business to help all those we can within our best abilities. We will raise funds to the best of our abilities. We will create and maintain partnerships to the best of our abilities.

The common theme here is that you all are my top priority. I trust that you will do what you can, when you can, to the fullest extent that you are able.


As we continue to move forward and do our best work, we need to carve out restorative time to breathe, unclench our jaws, and relax. We still have a long journey -- please take excellent care of yourselves.

Annual Report: The COVID-19 Edition

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The global health pandemic has affected every part of our lives, including this year's annual report. The Fiscal Year 2020 Public Library Survey (PLS) data collection will include 15 new questions developed to measure the impact of the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic on public libraries and public library services across the United States.


The New York State Library has recommended that libraries collect data on the services provided during the pandemic in order to report this activity to their governing boards, their communities and share the data with researchers in future surveys. In response to requests, the State Library will be adding three OPTIONAL questions to the 2020 NYS Annual Report for Public and Association Libraries to measure the number of live virtual programs, attendance at live virtual programs, and the number of recordings of program content. These questions ask for the total numbers, not broken down by age group, in the first year.


NEW COVID-19 QUESTIONS


Topic: Closed Outlets Due to COVID-19

Answer Yes or No to the following question: “Were any of the library’s outlets physically closed to the public for any period of time due to the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic?”

NOTE: An outlet is considered physically closed when the public cannot access any library buildings or bookmobiles, regardless of staff access. A building can be physically closed but still offer virtual, Wi-Fi, or “curbside” services outside the building.


Topic: Public Services During COVID-19

Answer Yes or No to the following question: “Did library staff continue to provide services to the public during any portion of the period when the building was physically closed to the public due to the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic?”

NOTE: Services to the public can include activities such as

• answering calls, emails, or texts with answers to information requests from the public;

• hosting virtual programming or recorded content;

• offering “curbside,” delivery (mail or drop-off), or drive-thru circulation of physical materials;

• managing IT services to ensure external Wi-Fi access; and

• providing other types of online and electronic services, regardless of the location of library staff when they provided services (i.e., working from home or in the building that was closed to the public).


Topic: Electronic Materials Added Due to COVID-19

Answer Yes or No to the following question: “Did the library add or increase access to electronic collection materials due to the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic?”

NOTE: Adding or increasing materials can include

• increasing the concurrent or monthly borrowing limits for electronic materials,

• increasing the number of electronic materials and holdings, or

• otherwise augmenting the public’s ability to use electronic materials. These materials can include those the library did not pay for itself, such as those provided through the state library administrative agency, library consortium, or vendor at no cost in response to the pandemic.

Types of electronic materials include e-books, audio and video downloadables, e-serials (including journals), government documents, databases (including locally mounted, full text or not), electronic files, reference tools, scores, maps, or pictures in electronic or digital format, including materials digitized by the library.


Topic: Electronic Library Cards Issued Before COVID-19

Answer Yes or No to the following question: “Did the library allow users to complete registration for library cards online without having to come to the library before the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic?”

NOTE: Online library cards provide users access to electronic collection materials and databases without having to be physically present at a library outlet to register for the card.


Topic: Electronic Library Cards Issued During COVID-19

Answer Yes or No to the following question: “Did the library allow users to complete registration for library cards online without having to come to the library during the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic?”

NOTE: Online library cards provide users access to electronic collection materials and databases without having to be physically present at a library outlet to register for the card.


Topic: Reference Service During COVID-19

Answer Yes or No to the following question: “Did the library provide reference service via the Internet or telephone when the building was physically closed to the public during the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic?”

NOTE: Include references service provided via email, chat, and text.


Topic: Outside Service During COVID-19

Answer Yes or No to the following question: “Did the library provide ‘outside’ service for circulation of physical materials at one or more outlets during the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic?”

NOTE: Includes any contactless or minimal contact provision of circulation items. Similar terms could include curbside, vestibule, or porch pickups, delivery (mail or drop-off), drive-thru, etc.


Topic: Live Virtual Programs During COVID-19

Answer Yes or No to the following question: “Did the library provide live, virtual programs via the Internet during the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic?”

NOTE: Live, virtual programs are conducted via a Web conferencing or Webinar platform such as Facebook, YouTube, or Zoom, during which a library staff member (or other party sponsored by the library) is presenting to or interacting with an audience in real-time.


Additional NYS Annual Report Questions - Part 3, Library Programs, Policies and Services (Optional response. Responses to new questions requiring numerical data may be estimated or left blank the first year.)


Report total number of live virtual programs during COVID-19 pandemic

Report total attendance at live virtual programs during COVID-19 pandemic


Topic: Recordings of Program Content During COVID-19

Answer Yes or No to the following question: “Did the library create and provide recordings of program content via the Internet during the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic?”

NOTE: Recordings of program content include video or audio recordings created by a library staff person (or other party sponsored by the library) and posted to a video or audio hosting platform for the audience to view or listen to on-demand. Do not include promotional or marketing content.


Additional NYS Annual Report Question - Part 3, Library Programs, Policies and Services (Optional response. Responses to new questions requiring numerical data may be estimated or left blank the first year.)

Report total number of recordings of program content during COVID-19 pandemic


Topic: External Wi-Fi Access Before COVID-19

Answer Yes or No to the following question: “Did the library provide Wi-Fi Internet access to users outside the building at one or more outlets before the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic?”

NOTE: Includes “parking lot access,” bookmobiles, or other mobile facilities with Wi-Fi capabilities.


Topic: External Wi-Fi Access Added During COVID-19

Answer Yes or No to the following question: “Did the library intentionally provide Wi-Fi Internet access to users outside the building at one or more outlets during the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic?”

NOTE: Includes “parking lot access,” bookmobiles, or other mobile facilities with Wi-Fi capabilities.


Topic: External Wi-Fi Access Increased During COVID-19

Answer Yes or No to the following question: “Did the library increase access to Wi-Fi Internet access to users outside the building at one or more outlets during the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic?”

NOTE: Includes “parking lot access,” bookmobiles, or other mobile facilities with Wi-Fi capabilities. Increasing access could mean removing restrictions on sign-in authorizations, expanding router reach, leaving Wi-Fi service on 24 hours, installing or moving access points to promote or improve external access, etc.


Topic: Staff Re-Assigned During COVID-19

Answer Yes or No to the following question: “Did library staff work for other government agencies or nonprofit organizations instead of, or in addition to, their normal duties during the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic?”

NOTE: Include reassignments to other government agencies (e.g., to process unemployment claims), as well as other activities such as the use of library staff to distribute school lunches and other materials. Volunteering during work hours counts but volunteering off-hours would not.


Topic: Number of Weeks an Outlet Closed Due to COVID-19

This is the number of weeks during the year that due to the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, an outlet building was physically closed, and the public could not enter when it otherwise would have been open. NOTE: Round to the nearest whole number. If the building did not close to the public due to the pandemic, enter zero. The sum of the Number of Weeks an Outlet is Open (Q9.16) and the Number of Weeks an Outlet Closed Due to COVID-19 should equal or be fewer than 52 weeks. An outlet is considered physically closed when the public cannot access any library buildings or bookmobiles, regardless of staff access. A building can be physically closed but still offer virtual, Wi-Fi, or “curbside” services outside the building.


Topic: Number of Weeks an Outlet Had Limited Occupancy Due to COVID-19

This is the number of weeks during the year that an outlet implemented limited public occupancy practices for in-person services at the library building in response to the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. If the building did not have a limited occupancy or similar practice due to the pandemic, enter zero. Weeks can be counted in both the Number of Weeks an Outlet is Open and the Number of Weeks an Outlet Had Limited Occupancy Due to COVID-19 (that is, a library was open to the public and implementing limited occupancy practices in the same week). Limited public occupancy practices can include reduced hours open, limits on the number of public members inside the physical building, appointment only on-site library use, visitor time limits, closed stacks or meeting rooms, etc.

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Next Monday, Sept. 7 (Labor Day), is the deadline to receive free materials to promote National Voter Registration Day.


National Voter Registration Day will be held on Tuesday, September 22. Libraries can participate in-person or virtually to help your community learn about registering to vote, check voter registration, or update registration if someone's address or name has changed.


NVRD will ship you free materials if you sign up by Sept. 7. (You can still sign up after Sept. 7 – you just won’t receive materials in the mail.) Want to learn more? The American Library Association has a recorded webinar.

Anti-Racist Resources

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The New York Black Librarians Caucus is finishing up its excellent, six-part series of webinars addressing the issue of racism in libraries. If you missed the conversation and would like to catch up, recordings are now available on YouTube.


In addition to the webinars, the NYBLC is sharing the following resources:



To learn more about trauma-informed librarianship, watch Karina Hagelin's webinar.


In addition, the Junior League of Schenectady & Saratoga has partnered with the Proctors Collaborative and Samaritan Counseling to create the Capital Region Anti-Racism Community Training Initiative. They will be launching an Allyship Institute Training Series in September.


And if you haven't had a chance to check out the Denver Public Library's Racial Equity Symposium, it's not too late to check out some of the terrific speakers.

Combating Racism in Libraries: Creating Spaces to Educate and Inform Our Communities

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The Public Library Section and Ethnic Services Round Table of NYLA have joined forces to create a series of webinars, "Combating Racism in Libraries: Creating Spaces to Educate and Inform Our Communities." The goal of the series is for libraries and library staff to learn, share, and discuss the historical and present-day barriers communities are facing regarding racism against the Black community. There is no fee to participate in this series.

Everybody Counts: Final Push for Census

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The verdict is in. New York is falling behind other states when it comes to getting a complete count for the census. The majority of the state has fewer people counted than in the 2010 census, which results in losing political representation and less funding for critical services. Now that the federal government has changed the deadline to respond, we need to mobilize to ensure your communities are counted.


If you have questions about the 2020 Census or need help promoting it, let us know!

Lifelong Learning Opportunity

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Unprecedented times call for unprecedented approaches to collaboration and connection.


Organized by the libraries in Alberta, Canada, the Stronger Together Virtual Conference explores the ways connection helps libraries become resilient and better able to serve our communities, even in times of uncertainty. This free conference has two full days of 47 speakers covering a wide range of topics.

Occupy Library Conference

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One upside of the pandemic has been the eruption of endless virtual professional development opportunities. For those interested in something a bit different, join the formative/funky/fab/free-of-charge Occupy Library Conference, from 22 to 25 September, and get ready to hear inspiring stories, meet friendly people and share your innovative ideas with curious makers from around the world!


Get your free ticket, as a participant, and learn from those who have been there and have done that!

Jobs Jobs Jobs!!!

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Public Services Consultant

The Mohawk Valley Library System is searching for a Public Services Consultant. This position works with public libraries in Fulton, Montgomery, Schenectady, and Schoharie counties and with community partners, contributing toward library public services supporting system goals for youth services, family services, and outreach.


The deadline to apply is Friday, October 02, 2020.

Library Director: Argyle Free Library

The Argyle Free Library is looking for a Library Director.


The Library Director serves as the Chief Executive Officer of the Library and is responsible for the administration of all library functions within the goals, guidelines and policies established by the Library Board of Trustees. This responsibility includes the organization and dissemination of information and services through the effective utilization of library resources. The Director is also responsible for the facilities, programming and events, financial management and personnel of the Library, under the governance and oversight of the Board.


The Director is expected to provide a leadership role within the library, the community, and the library profession. The Director serves as the official representative of the Library. This is a part-time position, 20 - 30 hours per week.


Minimum Qualifications:


  • MUST have at least an Associate’s Degree in any field, as per NY State Law


Desired Qualifications:


  • A Bachelor’s Degree or an MLS from an ALA-accredited institution.
  • Previous library work experience including experience coordinating with local organizations to develop community programs.
  • Prior experience with social media including website and Facebook marketing for a business or organization.
  • A background in management.

Responsibilities:

  • Make policy recommendations to the Board of Trustees and implement policies and procedures.
  • Participate in the budget process and monitor all expenditures.
  • Provide monthly financial planning information to assist in establishing both short term and long term priorities.
  • Provide orientation and resources to new Trustees and Employees.
  • Manage employees, provide training for employees as needed, and coordinate their schedules.
  • Direct the maintenance of the library building and grounds, and recommend future space needs and reorganization of library areas.
  • Establish and maintain a staff manual of library procedures.
  • Provide leadership, take initiative, solve problems, and effect change through development and encouragement of staff.
  • Research community needs, and plan and implement programs to support those needs.
  • Attend all Board of Trustee meetings, and ensure Trustees are aware of Southern Adirondack Library System (SALS) and other communications in a timely fashion.
  • Maintain the library website and social media.
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of the library collection and order materials (books, periodicals, DVDs, etc.) to support community needs.
  • Maintain an orderly and usable library catalog, in accordance with the ent library and SALS requirements.
  • Provide customer service, build relationships with community organizations, and provide an environment that is aligned with that of the Board and AFL policies.
  • Other duties, as assigned.


Work and Physical Requirements

  • Duties require periods of standing, sitting, walking, navigating stairs, and carrying weight up to 30 pounds.
  • Public speaking.
  • Provide own transportation to work-related meetings, workshops, conferences, etc.
  • Occasional Saturday and evening hours as needed (board meetings, special events, etc).


To apply: Send a cover letter and resume to Argyle Free Library Personnel Committee, PO Box 238, Argyle, NY 12809 or email to snellpr@gmail.com.

Library Director 1: Cohoes Public Library

The Cohoes Public Library seeks an enthusiastic, energetic, community invested librarian to serve as Library Director. Working with the Board of Trustees, the City of Cohoes, and local stakeholders, the director provides leadership in providing high quality, 21st Century library services to our diverse community.


Serving a growing population of more than 16,000, the Cohoes Public Library is a municipal public library and a member of the Upper Hudson Library System. In 2019 library circulation totaled 31,800 items and had 37,500 library visits. A variety of programming for all ages is provided both inside the facility and at community sites. The library is located in the former St. John’s Episcopal Church.


The Director reports to a nine-member Board of Trustees and works closely with the City of Cohoes. The Director has primary responsibility for the operation and management of the library, collaborates with the Library Board on the annual budget request to the City of Cohoes, and serves as the principal representative of the library in the community. Specific job activities include, but are not limited to: personnel administration; budget oversight; collection development; customer service; program planning and implementation, particularly for children; implementation of technology to enhance library services; and marketing/public relations. The library board encourages and supports the library director’s participation in regional and statewide professional activities.


The Library Director I is a Civil Service position. This is a provisional appointment pending Civil Service examination of training and experience. Prior to appointment, the successful candidate will be required to submit a completed Civil Service application.


Minimum qualifications include possession of a Master’s degree in librarianship from a library school accredited by the American Library Association or recognized by the New York State Education Department as following acceptable education practices AND one year of satisfactory professional library experience. Eligibility for a New York State Public Librarian’s certificate at the time of application is required and possession of the certificate is required at the time of appointment.


The Library Director’s annual salary will be $40,000 - $48,000 based on the selected candidate’s skills and experience. The generous compensation package also includes health insurance and participation in the New York State Retirement System.


Qualified applicants should submit a cover letter, resume, and contact information for three professional references to the Search Committee via email to directorsearch@cohoespubliclibrary.org.


Application review will begin on September 15, 2020, and continue until the position is filled.

Library Director: Schoharie Free Library

The Schoharie Free Library seeks a community-minded, organized and enthusiastic individual for the position of Library Director.


The Schoharie Free Library is an association library in the rural Village of Schoharie, New York. The library celebrated its 100th Anniversary in 2016.


The ideal candidate will have strong interpersonal skills, demonstrated ability to effectively engage the public and a passion for the importance of libraries in our communities. Working closely with the Board of Trustees, the Library Director organizes, coordinates, helps create and oversees library programs, selects and curates the Library’s collection of books and other materials, develops policies, creates public relations materials, maintains and enhances online and social media presence, meets and engages with community leaders and patrons, supervises staff and volunteers, oversees the physical plant, engages in fundraising and grant writing and administration, develops and manages the budget and finances, and stays informed of developments in library management. The Library Director will supervise one to two part-time employees.


Qualifications:

  • Holds a Master of Library Science degree from an accredited university or equivalent and has approximately 1 year of relevant experience.
  • Capable of writing and administering grant applications and grant paperwork.
  • Exhibits strong skills in traditional, online database and Internet research.
  • Exhibits strong communication and organizational skills.
  • Has served in a supervisory capacity.
  • Attends appropriate continuing education workshops and conferences.
  • Reads professional journals to remain abreast of developments in the profession.
  • Maintains membership and participates in professional library associations.


The position is based on a 35-hour workweek, with nights and weekends as needed. The salary range is between $35,000 and low $40,000s, with compensation based on education and experience. Benefits include paid time off, contributions to medical insurance, and retirement IRA (after one year of service).


Review of applications will begin September 28, 2020. To apply: Send cover letter, resume, and the contact information of three professionals to:


Pat Clancy, President

SFL Board of Trustees

5973 State Route 30

Schoharie NY 12157

Or by email: pclancy424@gmail.com

Free Art & Poetry Books

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After pausing operations due to the COVID-19 outbreak, D.U.C. is now accepting and shipping book orders. Our catalog offers 300+ titles on contemporary art by 60+ publishers. All public schools and libraries are eligible to place annual orders. Books are entirely free and shipped free of charge.


Reading Resources, our online teaching guides, can support remote learning. Our most recent one focuses on the work of Kara Walker, re-examining the histories and ongoing practices of racism in our country. This new online teaching guide considers strategies for thinking about her work in relation to the history of slavery in the U.S., and supports difficult conversations around how history is represented.


But wait, there's more! Art Resources Transfer's 2020 Poulin Project box set is now available!


If you are a public institution in New York State, request your free box set of poetry, literature, and nonfiction writing.

The Poulin Project is a NYSCA-funded initiative that provides New York State libraries, schools, and alternative education centers with free box sets of contemporary literature from small presses around the state. Sets include 75 titles by publishers including Turtle Point Press, Ugly Duckling Presse, Verso Books, and Fence Books. Please note we are limited to distributing 75 sets, and you can expect its shipment by the end of September.

Library Shark Tank

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Is your library a player in economic development? Do you have an idea on how your library could contribute to job creation, entrepreneurship, and nonprofits -- but you could use a little funding to get started?


@ the Table is the inaugural pitch competition of the Entrepreneurship & Libraries Conference (ELC). Libraries will be invited to pitch ideas or initiatives to stakeholders in economic development. The focus of the pitches is how a library can support local economic development, job creation, workforce development, entrepreneurs, nonprofits, small businesses, or innovation in general.


Submissions should be specific about the target population, the problem addressed, resources available or needed, and the service provided or value added. Submitters should pretend their audience is local community partners, not fellow librarians.


Five finalists will have up to five minutes to pitch their idea or initiative live and online to a panel of economic development professionals and the ELC 2020 attendees. The first place library will receive $2,000. $500 will be awarded to both the second place winner and the audience choice winner. EBSCO is the generous sponsor of this competition.


Jennifer Hensel at Launch Greensboro will be providing pre-recorded best practices for all contestants, as well as one-on-one consultations with the five finalists before the live pitching takes place.


The competition will take place live online at 3 pm EST Thursday, November 12. Registration for the ELC will be free.


Apply by: Friday, September 25, 2020 at 5pm Eastern.

Learn All the Things!

Helping Students Succeed During COVID-19

Tuesday, Sep. 8th, 3pm

This is an online event.

This webinar will examine how public libraries across the country are helping students, their parents, and teachers succeed in the new world of distance learning. We will look at popular educational websites and reading resources as well as examples of videos designed to help Spanish-language speakers access the library's resources. We will also discuss how one library continues to provide class visits during stay-at-home and will learn about "pandemic pods." We will even share how some libraries are helping families deal with food insecurity due to school closures.


At the end of this one-hour webinar, participants will:


  • Feel more confident in their ability to help students, parents, and teachers succeed in a distance learning environment.
  • Learn how other public libraries nationwide are helping students, parents, and teachers succeed in a distance learning environment.
  • Consider this current crisis as an opportunity to work more closely with teachers and schools.


This webinar will be of interest to all public library staff who work with students, families and teachers

Overcoming FLUs: Practical Advice for Furloughs, Layoffs, and Uncertainty

Wednesday, Sep. 9th, 4pm

This is an online event.


Ping. The email hits your inbox. “We regret to inform you that…” Receiving news of a temporary or permanent separation is one of the unfortunate aspects of modern employment. While there’s only so much preparation one can do until it actually happens, we will share our personal experiences being impacted by employment separations. In this session, you'll learn tips for navigating new financial circumstances, as well as ways to keep your job search moving forward under challenging circumstances.

Towards a Mindful Practice in Library Work

Tuesday, Sep. 22nd, 3pm

This is an online event.

In this webinar, you will learn about mindfulness from a practitioner (Mimosa Shah) and a scholar (Beck Tench) who have spent the last five years collaborating on how to practice mindfulness in libraries with integrity and resilience. We will move beyond the common understandings and examples of mindfulness, looking from both a critical and optimistic points-of-view. We will discuss what mindfulness is, why we might practice it, and how to do so, with a special focus on library-specific issues.


At the end of this one-hour webinar, participants will:

  • Understand the mindfulness movement across history and wisdom traditions
  • Understand the varied reasons why we might practice mindfulness and what the consequences of those practices might be
  • Gain exposure to the wide range of mindfulness activities, including ideas about how to create their own
  • Consider mindfulness from scholarly and practitioner perspectives

This webinar will be of interest to: all library workers that have a curiosity/tendency towards mindfulness.


Webinars are free of charge. If you pre-registered you will receive an email with login link and a reminder email the day before the event.


To check your system's compatibility with GoTo Webinar and/or download software for your computer/tablet/smartphone, see this page(link is external).

Engaging Millennials as Friends Volunteers.

Wednesday, Sep. 23rd, 2pm

This is an online event.

Reaching across generations to recruit younger volunteers to actively participate in the work of Friends organizations is challenging. But it is doable and vital to the continued success of volunteer support groups for libraries. Millennials are eager to join in and give their time and energy to causes they are passionate about. Come discuss ways Friends can coordinate, collaborate, and promote opportunities for young adults that are both social and make a difference in the community. Get suggestions on how to target and make connections with these potential volunteers who are motivated to make their community a better place by using their skills and expertise to meet the needs of 21st century library patrons.


Presenters:

Tess Wilson, Community Engagement Coordinator for the National Network of Libraries of Medicine – Middle Atlantic Region, and Madeline Jarvis, Adult and Information Services Manager at the Marion (Iowa) Public Library. Tess and Madeline authored a book, All Ages Welcome: Recruiting and Retaining Younger Generations for Library Boards, Friends Groups, and Foundations, a toolkit for libraries on engaging Millennials.


This professional development opportunity is open to all. Registration is open on NYLA’s website: www.nyla.org > Career Resources > Continuing Education > NYLA e-Institute Webinars.


The webinar is $25 for NYLA personal or organizational members (who are not members of FLS) and $35 for those who are not members of NYLA. Group registrations are available ($75 member rate /$99 nonmember rate). A credit card is required for payment.


As a member benefit, the primary contact person and group volunteers of Friends Group organizational members who are listed on the “Friend Group Volunteers Registration Form” on file with the NYLA Finance & Administration Manager and personal FLS members may participate at no cost. The FLS/NYLA membership must be current at the time of registration, with the membership expiration date beyond the date of the webinar.

What Libraries Need To Know To Survive A Ransomware Attack

Thursday, Sep. 24th, 1pm

This is an online event.

Ransomware (software that blocks access to systems until money is paid to the attacker) can be disruptive and expensive. For some libraries it can be catastrophic, though it doesn’t have to be. Planning and preparation are key to surviving a ransomware attack. This presentation will focus on cybersecurity needs to help libraries protect their systems from ransomware.


Participants will learn the steps to take at your institution to ensure that you can survive a ransomware attack. The presentation will cover plans, tools, and techniques that can help lower the risk of a ransomware attack, regardless of your budget.


Registrants will be emailed with the Zoom link one day prior to the meeting. This workshop will not be recorded.


Note: To create an account, go to the upper right-hand corner of the website, and choose the “Create an account” tab. Click on that to get started. Select “Other 3Rs Library Council Member” to select CDLC.

What's Next: Libraries Adapt to the New Abnormal

Tuesday, Oct. 6th, 10:30am

This is an online event.

With the COVID-19 pandemic upending strategic plans across the country, libraries have had to be nimble, flexible, and collaborative on a scale and time frame like never before. Fortunately, all three of those proficiencies are in the library wheelhouse.


In this free, day-long, virtual event, Library Journal will convene leaders at every level to share their learnings from the first phase of the crisis, how they’re preparing for the multiple possibilities of the medium-term—and beyond—and positioning themselves to come out of the recovery strong.