Ecology

By: Kaci Reyes and Courtney Roberts 5th

Ecology Terms

Biotic and Abiotic Factors

Autotroph and Heterotroph

Predator and Prey Relationship

Mutualism

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Photo taken by Kaci Reyes 4/19/15

Mutualism is defined as a relationship where both organisms benefit. This is mutalism because both the leaves and the tree benefit from this relationship. The leaves of the smaller plant have a place to grow and are protected. The tree also benefits because the smaller plant makes food which in turn goes to the bark of the tree to be distributed as nutrients to the rest of the tree.

Commensalism

Commensalism is where one organism benefits and the other isn't benefited or harmed. Barnacles on a whale is an example of this because the barnacles are carried from one place to the other and can get food and nutrients such as plankton from areas around the whale. The whale though is not harmed or benefited by these organisms. Therefore it is a commensalism relationship.

Parasitism

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Photo taken by Kaci Reyes 4/19/15

Parasitism is a relationship in which one organism is impacted in a negative way while the other benefits. This catapillar on the tree is a good example because the catapillar eats the leaves to get energy while the tree is hurt because the catapillar is eating the leaves which produce food and nutrients for the overall tree. The catapillar gains while the tree is hurt.

Food Chain

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Producer: Grass

Photo taken by Kaci Reyes 4/19/15

The grass is an autotroph that can make its own food from the sun. It provides the main energy for the rest of the food chain and receives 100% of the energy from the sun.
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Primary Consumer: Chicken

Photo taken by Kaci Reyes 4/19/15

The chicken is a primary consumer because it is an herbivore that eats the grass and receives only 10% of the original energy from the sun that is in the grass.
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Secondary Consumer: Alligator

Photo taken by Kaci Reyes 4/19/15

The alligator is a secondary consumer because it eats the chicken. Secondary consumers can only receive 1% of the original energy from the sun, but is not restricted to being just herbivore or carnivore.
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Tertiary Consumer: Human Being

Photo taken by Kaci Reyes 4/19/15

The human is the tertiary consumer because it consumes the secondary consumer which is the alligator. The tertiary consumer can not be eaten by anything else and only receives 0.1% of the original energy from the sun since it is so far up on the food chain.

How Carbon Dioxide is Emitted Into the Atmosphere

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Respiration

Photo taken by Kaci Reyes 4/19/15

A fish undergoes the respiration cycle, where the organism takes in oxygen and releases carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.
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Gasoline Emission

Photo taken by Courtney Roberts 4/19/15

The gas that is released by a car is carbon dioxide. Cars typically emit the most amount of greenhouse gases into our atmosphere.
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Plane Fuel Emission

Photo taken by Kaci Reyes 4/19/15

Planes also emit a lot of carbon dioxide into our atmosphere because of the large amount of gasoline it takes to fly at a faster speed and longer distances.
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Decompostion

Photo taken by Kaci Reyes 4/19/15

A rotting body emits extra gases from inside the body and as certain body parts rot, they also release carbon dioxide in order to decompose into the earth.

How Carbon Dioxide is Taken Out of The Atmosphere

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Plants

Photo taken by Courtney Roberts 4/19/15

Plants undergo photosynthesis that help take carbon dioxide out of the air and release oxygen into the atmosphere for other organisms, such as humans and animals, to use. Photosynthesis is the only way for oxygen to be released into the atmosphere and for carbon dioxide to be taken out.