Leaf Lab

By Mikaela Stokes & McKenzie Ivins

Problem:

I wonder what would happen to the leaf if we added coloring to the water.
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Hypothesis:

If the water contains food coloring then the leaf will not absorb as much water.
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The manipulated variable:

The manipulated variable is the food coloring.
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Control:

Our control will be in room temperature with regular water and just daylight shining upon it.
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Description:

Photometer (to measure the water the leaf absorbs)

Two clamps (to hold it together)

Ring stand (to hold the photometer and pipet attached together in place)

Pipet (to attach to the photometer and leaf)

Syringe (to pour the water in the photometer/pipet)

Petroleum Jelly (to block the air way of the leaf)

Leaf (that has previously absorbed water)

Food Coloring (red)

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Materials:

Photometer

Two clamps

Ring stand

Pipet

Syringe

Petroleum Jelly

Leaf

Food Coloring

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Procedure (manipulated):

1. Dye the water

2. Attach the pipet and photometer to each other.

3. Pour water into the pipet with the syringe (make sure there aren't any bubbles!).

4. Attach the syringe to the ring stand and hold it in place with the two clamps.

5. Graph the leaf and calculate the area of the leaf.

6. Cut the leaf stand at a 45 degree angle.

7. Put the leaf with the stem in the pipet and seal the remaining opening with the petroleum jelly.

8. Record the initial amount of water in the photometer.

9. Start the timer and record the amount of water in the photometer every 2 minutes for 16 minutes.

10. Conduct a phi test.

11. Analyze data and come to a conclusion.

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Procedure (control):

1. Attach the pipet and photometer to each other.

2. Pour water into the pipet with the syringe (make sure there aren't any bubbles!).

3. Attach the syringe to the ring stand and hold it in place with the two clamps.

4. Graph the leaf and calculate the area of the leaf.

5. Cut the leaf stand at a 45 degree angle.

6. Put the leaf with the stem in the pipet and seal the remaining opening with the petroleum jelly.

7. Record the initial amount of water in the photometer.

8. Start the timer and record the amount of water in the photometer every 2 minutes for 16 minutes.

9. Conduct a phi test.

10. Analyze data and come to a conclusion.

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Observations:

We saw our leaf of which considered of an area of 2,200, absorb a total of .08 milliliters per millimeter per minute.
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Dyed Water Expirement:

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All of the experiments:

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Analysis:

A chi test was not used in this experiment due to there not being a consistency of water absorbed.
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Conclusion:

In conclusion, the experiment did support the hypothesis. The leaf did absorb more water when it was dyed then when it wasn't in the control.
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